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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Malagasy
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      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 183
    #1

    something about the fan

    hi,

    i do not know how to tell people about 'using' the fan. my questions are..

    1. what will native speakers of english normally say to turn the fan to them?

    2. what do you normally say to get the fan to move/swing from side to side or oscillate?

    3. is the air that flow from the fan called air current?

    4. if i want to get the fan to produce stronger air current, what should i say?

    5. the air conditioner, we say turn up the air conditioner, right? meaning to make it colder?

    thanks. these things are not taught at schools in my country where english is L2.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • English
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      • Australia
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      • Australia

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    • Posts: 24,091
    #2

    Re: something about the fan

    Quote Originally Posted by sebayanpendam View Post
    hi,

    i do not know how to tell people about 'using' the fan. my questions are..

    1. what will native speakers of english normally say to turn the fan to them?
    Hey, can I get some of that air, please?

    2. what do you normally say to get the fan to move/swing from side to side or oscillate?
    Can someone switch that fan to 'oscillate'?

    3. is the air that flow from the fan called air current?
    I'd call it air flow, or breeze. "I'm not getting any breeze from that fan."

    4. if i want to get the fan to produce stronger air current, what should i say?
    "The fan needs to be turned up."

    5. the air conditioner, we say turn up the air conditioner, right? meaning to make it colder?
    It's depends. If it's hot and you ask for it to be turned up, it would be understood that you meant that.

    thanks. these things are not taught at schools in my country where english is L2.
    If you're the boss, you can say:
    "Hey, I'm not getting any breeze from that fan. Can someone switch it to oscillate, or turn it to face me too, so I can get some air. Oh, and turn it up too!"

    If you are not the boss, you'd use more polite phrasing, with questions rather than imperatives.
    Last edited by Raymott; 18-Jun-2010 at 16:22.

    • Member Info
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      • Malagasy
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      • Malaysia
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    #3

    Re: something about the fan

    Thank you so much.

    i will be the boss one day.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #4

    Re: something about the fan

    But you will still remember to say "please" and "thank you," right?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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