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  1. manou.glamour's Avatar

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    #1

    ask

    When we want to use an adverbe frequency in the future we say for example we will be always proud of you, or we will always be proud of you ,I'm confused Thank you

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by manou.glamour View Post
    When we want to use an adverbe frequency in the future we say for example we will be always proud of you, or we will always be proud of you ,I'm confused Thank you
    We will always be proud of you.
    I will always like potatoes!
    They will always have each other.

    I will never like olives.
    He will never look like Brad Pitt.
    She will never forget what happened.

    Basically, the "frequency" always comes before the main part of the verb, no matter what tense:

    I always feel tired in the mornings.
    I have never been to Antarctica.
    I occasionally go to the cinema.
    He never went to bed before midnight.
    I will always love chocolate.

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    #3

    Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by manou.glamour View Post
    When we want to use an adverbe frequency in the future we say for example we will be always proud of you, or we will always be proud of you ,I'm confused Thank you
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Manou.

    (1) Teacher EMSR has given you an excellent answer.

    (2) I only wish to add that the adverb usually goes AFTER

    am/is/are/was/were:

    I am usually on time.
    You are always on time.
    He is never on time.
    She was probably on time.
    We were frequently early.

    *****

    (3) You may put the adverb before am/is/are/was/were

    IF you want to emphasize those verbs:

    The boss: Why are you late today? I am very angry with you.

    Tom: I'm sorry, but I usually AM on time. It won't happen again.

    ***** Thank you *****

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