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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
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      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
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    #1

    Being stereotypical...

    Is the word "stereotypical" if it would mean lacking in originality, spontaneity, and individuality (accdg. to stereotypical definition in the freedictionary (the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia) in the thesaurus portion of that webpage) commonly used in the English language? Does anybody have any encounter with someone using the word inaccurately?

    Or, what does it really mean when a person is being stereotypical? Alright. I know what it means when a person is a stereotypical of....

    ( I want to use the word but I'm not sure if it's commonly used to mean that way. )

    Have you used it to mean that way in describing other people? For instance, have you said, "You're being stereotypical. Can't you be a bit original?"

    Did I say it right? Could I say it that way?

    A native speaker of English told me this:

    One could imagine a stereotypical stand-up comedian who would likely be the antithesis of "unimaginative, lacking spontaneity or originality or individuality". I would venture that it is the person who "applies" the characterization (someone who stereotypes someone else without any real thought) who lacks the imagination.

    Would you agree with him? So what do you think? Please let me know. Thank you in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • UK
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      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #2

    Re: Being stereotypical...

    They have got a point, but I don't completely agree because the originality and spontaneity that your native speaker is referring to are surely measured against the ordinary person in the street- to so stand-up requires certain characteristics that most ordinary people don't possess. However, if you get a group of stand up comedians, they will mostly have these characteristics and it may well start to look a lot less fresh and original.

    Many might think of the stereotypical stand-up comedian as telling mediocre jokes you've heard before. If a comedian were genuinely spontaneous, original and imaginative, I can't see anyone describing them as stereotypical. The term can often be itself a cliché, an unintentional irony that does reflect on the person applying the characterisation. The term is mostly used for less extreme groups, though.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: Being stereotypical...

    Quote Originally Posted by asdf1234 View Post
    Is the word "stereotypical" if it would mean lacking in originality, spontaneity, and individuality (accdg. to stereotypical definition in the freedictionary (the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia) in the thesaurus portion of that webpage) commonly used in the English language? Does anybody have any encounter with someone using the word inaccurately?

    Or, what does it really mean when a person is being stereotypical? Alright. I know what it means when a person is a stereotypical of....

    ( I want to use the word but I'm not sure if it's commonly used to mean that way. )

    Have you used it to mean that way in describing other people? For instance, have you said, "You're being stereotypical. Can't you be a bit














    original?"

    Did I say it right? Could I say it that way?

    A native speaker of English told me this:

    One could imagine a stereotypical stand-up comedian who would likely be the antithesis of "unimaginative, lacking spontaneity or originality or individuality". I would venture that it is the person who "applies" the characterization (someone who stereotypes someone else without any real thought) who lacks the imagination.

    Would you agree with him? So what do you think? Please let me know. Thank you in advance.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, ASDF.

    (1) I am not sure that I understand your question.

    (2) For example, if you wanted to refer to a comedian who is not better

    or worse than other comedians, you might describe him/her as "typical,"

    "standard," or "regular" or "average."

    (3) I notice that you are now living here in the States. I think it would

    be helpful to stay away from the word "stereotype" ( and its various

    forms), for this word often has a negative flavor in this country.

    (a) For example, if a co-worker accuses you of making a stereotypical

    comment to him/her, you will be in big trouble, because that usually

    means that you supposedly made a generalization about that person's

    gender, religion, race, or even height or weight.

    ***** Thank you *****
    Last edited by TheParser; 19-Jun-2010 at 19:31.

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