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    #1

    and/but

    I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. I'm 65 and my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    2. I'm 65 but my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.

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    #2

    Re: and/but

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. I'm 65 and my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    2. I'm 65 but my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    "and" is used to join two words, phrases, parts of sentences or related statements together; also or in addition to...
    For example:
    Ann and Jim
    boys and girls
    knives and forks
    We were wet and tired.

    "But" is used to introduce an added statement, usually something that is different from what you have said before...
    For example:
    She's very hard-working but not very imaginative.
    This is not caused by evil, but by simple ignorance.
    The play's good, but not that good - I've seen better.
    I'm sorry, but I think you're wrong when you say she did it deliberately.

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    #3

    Re: and/but

    ----- I am not an ESL -----

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. I'm 65 and my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    2. I'm 65 but my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    From a logical perspective the meaning is the same. Either using "and" or "but" you give two independent informations.

    However, from a linguistic point of view, when you use the conjunction "but" it emphasizes a contrast. That is, when someone is 65 years old, he is not expected to have his hair brushed out of his eyes by his mother.

    Thinking deeper, in order to tell whether there is a subtle difference in meaning, the speaker's intonation sure plays an important role. For example, depending on the speaker's intonation you may say that the above sentences could mean:
    1. In spite of the fact that I'm 65, my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    2. Although I'm 65, my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.

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    #4

    Re: and/but

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is any difference in the meaning between "1" and "2".
    1. I'm 65 and my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    2. I'm 65 but my mother still brushes my hair out of my eyes.
    In my view, the fact that this is surprising is conveyed by 'still' in both sentences and the common understanding that the act performed is not expected. Therefore, the 'and'/'but' distinction is here minimal. In fact, I've uttered these and a few other similar sentences over and over in my head (here's one for me:

    'I've been living in this house for 3 years now and/but still haven't finished renovating it.')

    for the last few minutes and I can see absolutely no difference in meaning and, indeed, would say them with exactly the same intonation.

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