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    #1

    Smile have got

    hi
    my teacher told us the other day that HAVE GOT is not longer used in English, after someone asked which was the real difference between HAVE and HAVE GOT. Is it true because I´ve heard this in many movies and in shows. If possible tell me everything possible about it.

    the real dif., usage, everything!

    Thanks a lot

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have got

    "I've got" is alive and well in American English.

    Others will tell you its status in other parts of the world.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: have got

    Quote Originally Posted by elhithebest View Post
    hi
    my teacher told us the other day that HAVE GOT is not longer used in English, after someone asked which was the real difference between HAVE and HAVE GOT. Is it true because I´ve heard this in many movies and in shows. If possible tell me everything possible about it.

    the real dif., usage, everything!

    Thanks a lot
    You must note that 'have' is a primary verb, so it functions both as an auxiliary(helping) as well as a main verb.
    I have a car. (main verb, present simple-Possession)
    You can also say:
    I have got a car. (helping verb, present perfect- possession)
    Of course, Both 'Have' and 'Have got' can be used for possession grammatically but ‘have got’ is rarely used to show possession.
    The expression ‘have got’ is mostly used idiomatically to show ‘obligation’ or necessity; as:
    I have got to do my homework.(obligation)
    Drivers have got to get a license to drive a car. (necessity)

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: have got

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    ‘have got’ is rarely used to show possession.

    What dialect of English are you describing?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Exclamation Re: have got

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    What dialect of English are you describing?
    I have already said that the use of ‘have got’ to show possession is grammatically correct but when the same is possible with ‘have’ alone, why go for more words. However, I would like to replace the word ‘rarely’ with ‘less frequently’, which I think makes my intention clear.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 20-Jun-2010 at 04:29.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: have got

    Quote Originally Posted by elhithebest View Post
    hi
    my teacher told us the other day that HAVE GOT is not longer used in English, after someone asked which was the real difference between HAVE and HAVE GOT. Is it true because I´ve heard this in many movies and in shows. If possible tell me everything possible about it.

    the real dif., usage, everything!

    Thanks a lot
    "have got" is used all the time in English. It's far more common than "have" in AusE and, as you say, in international English-language media.
    sarat tells us it's not so common in IndianE, so maybe that's what your teacher is thinking of.

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    #7

    Re: have got

    "Have got" (for possession) is used in spoken BrE probably as often, if not more often, than "have".

    Have you got a pen I can borrow? (as opposed to "Do you have a...")
    Has he got brown hair or blond hair? (as opposed to "Does he have...")
    I've got four knives but no forks. (as opposed to "I have four...")

    As a teacher, I had, until recently, taught "to have" as the possession verb. However, I recently started teaching an 8-year-old Spanish child who is already learning English at school. At our first class, he showed me his English folder and the first two verbs he had been taught were "to be" and "to have got". I was very surprised to actually see "to have got" shown as the infinitive and that he had been taught to use it in the present simple, the negative and the interrogative. I have since been told by several students that at their formal classes they have also been taught that "to have got" should be learnt for possession, not just "to have".

    My personal opinion is that "I've got..." etc sounds fine in spoken English, but I would expect in a more formal, written piece, to find "I have..." I may, however, have to revise my opinion on this because, certainly in Spain, the students are being taught to both write and speak using "have got". They seem to be learning from pretty good textbooks, written by native speakers, so perhaps this is just something that we will have to get used to!

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    #8

    Smile Re: have got

    Thank you all

    As far as I knew the only difference was that HAVE GOT was informal and HAVE formal, and that HAVE GOT wasn´t used in the past tense.
    But when my teacher said that HAVE GOT was no longer used I felt disconcerted.

    As emsr2d2 said I haven´t ever seen TO HAVE GOT but just HAVE GOT and TO HAVE.

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    #9

    Re: have got

    Quirk et al., 1985:
    have to patterns either as a main verb or as an auxiliary with respect to
    operator constructions:

    Do we have to get up early tomorrow? (AmE and BrE)
    Have we to get up early tomorrow? (BrE - somewhat old-fashioned)
    In this, it resembles other uses of HAVE as a main verb (cf 3.34). DO-support,
    however, is the only construction in AmE and the dominant one in BrE.

    Although have got to has the same meanings of 'obligation' and 'logical
    necessity' as are expressed by have to, have got to tends not to have habitual meaning, and when combined with a verb of dynamic meaning, tends to refer to the future. There is thus a potential difference between:
    Jim's got to check the temperature every 12 hours. [I]
    Jim has to check the temperature every 12 hours. [2]
    Whereas [I] is likely to have the force of a directive, stipulating what Jim's
    duties will be in the future, [2] is more likely to indicate a habitual action
    ['This is what Jim's present duties consist of'].
    Both have to and have got to occur with epistemic meaning like that of must in sentences such as:
    Someone has to/has got to be telling lies
    You have to/have got to be joking,
    This has until recently been regarded as an AmE usage, but is now also current in BrE.
    In other contexts have to and have got to express a stronger meaning of 'logical necessity'.

    Studies in BrE usage show that over 85 per cent of instances of have to in negative and interrogative clauses are constructed with DO. Elicitation tests have further indicated that negative constructions without DO (of the kind I hadn't to walk more than a mile) are less acceptable than interrogative constructions without DO (such as Has he to answer the letter this week ?).

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    #10

    Re: have got

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    The expression ‘have got’ is mostly used idiomatically to show ‘obligation’
    'Have got' is not an expression in English nor is 'to have got to'. It is 'have got to'. Similarly, it is not 'to be' or 'to be to', it is 'be to'. They are semi-auxiliaries.

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