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    #1

    Smile Can I leave out the comma?

    In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views, on issues as varied as the legality of gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and agreement with the Tea Party. ---taken from the NYT

    Dear teacher,

    My question is, if I leave out the red comma, does the meaning remain the same? If not, could you explain it to me? Thanks.


    LQZ

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    #2

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views, on issues as varied as the legality of gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and agreement with the Tea Party. ---taken from the NYT

    Dear teacher,

    My question is, if I leave out the red comma, does the meaning remain the same? If not, could you explain it to me? Thanks.


    LQZ
    That comma should be removed.


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    #3

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by LQZ View Post
    In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views, on issues as varied as the legality of gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and agreement with the Tea Party. ---taken from the NYT

    Dear teacher,

    My question is, if I leave out the red comma, does the meaning remain the same? If not, could you explain it to me? Thanks.


    LQZ
    The comma functions as a nonrestrictive clause. If you remove the comma, the meaning of the sentence will change. Not only that but it will also become a run-on sentence. Let's break the sentence into smaller pieces:

    In nearly every political category [dependent clause], landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views [independent clause], on issues as varied as the legality of gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and agreement with the Tea Party [nonrestrictive clause]. ---taken from the NYT

    This sentence is grammatically and syntactically correct. A nonrestrictive clause is information that is not essential to the basic meaning of the sentence. If you remove the comma, it would still make sense: "In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views." The writer wants to provide a list of examples for the reader; however, the purpose in doing so is to elaborate on his definition of conservative beliefs here.

    It is possible to make the list a restrictive clause, but then you would need to revise parts of the sentence.

    So, yes, the meaning will change.

    How do you feel about landline-only? There are a few things going on in that compound.

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    #4

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by Editors4Writers View Post
    The comma functions as a nonrestrictive clause. If you remove the comma, the meaning of the sentence will change. Not only that but it will also become a run-on sentence. Let's break the sentence into smaller pieces:

    In nearly every political category [dependent clause], landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views [independent clause], on issues as varied as the legality of gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and agreement with the Tea Party [nonrestrictive clause]. ---taken from the NYT

    This sentence is grammatically and syntactically correct. A nonrestrictive clause is information that is not essential to the basic meaning of the sentence. If you remove the comma, it would still make sense: "In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views." The writer wants to provide a list of examples for the reader; however, the purpose in doing so is to elaborate on his definition of conservative beliefs here.

    It is possible to make the list a restrictive clause, but then you would need to revise parts of the sentence.

    So, yes, the meaning will change.

    How do you feel about landline-only? There are a few things going on in that compound.
    Thank you, Editors4Writers, for your detailed explanation. I have one more question: how would I revise the original sentence if I were to use a restrictive clause?


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    #5

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    You're very welcome.

    There are many ways you can make the list a restrictive clause.

    "In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views about gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and the Tea Party."
    Last edited by Red5; 23-Jun-2010 at 18:27.

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    #6

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by Editors4Writers View Post
    You're very welcome. Please tell your friends about Editors for Writers, Inc. We have a fantastic editing service for academic and admission papers.

    There are many ways you can make the list a restrictive clause.

    "In nearly every political category, landline-only owners side with traditionally conservative views about gay marriage, marijuana, abortion and the Tea Party."

    Editors for Writers, Inc.
    Thank you so much, Editor4writes. Actually this comma had bothered me for a long time until you answered my question.

    PS: I've visited your website and will tell those who need your service.

    LQZ

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    #7

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    That comma should be removed.
    I agree. I can't see any run-on problem either.
    The meaning does change a bit.


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    #8

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    不用谢,我很高兴我能有机会提供帮助。我们比那个shinewrite.com要好

    Raymott, we are talking about the New Yorker here. haha, they wouldn't use a comma if it didn't serve a purpose. In my professional opinion, the author uses a comma to introduce a nonrestrictive clause.

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    #9

    Re: Can I leave out the comma?

    I agree with 2006: the comma serves no purpose and should be removed:

    To agree with someone on something.

    If there was a 'that + subordinate clause' after 'Tea Party' and not a full-stop then the 'on something' could be used non-restrictively with commas:

    To agree with someone, on something, that ...

    or possibly:

    To agree with someone (on something) that ...

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