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    #1

    10 Simple sentences (2)

    I understood what my friends begged or encouraged me to do in my previous thread. So, thanks to them.

    ---Present Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: Holland have won over Cameroon today. >> Sorry, it became an object of preposition.
    Passive Voice: Cameroon have been won by Holland yesterday.
    Though Holland and Cameroon are common nouns which contain a group of players, should I use a plural verb just like “have”?

    ---Present continuous Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: Tom has been killing venomous snakes since last year.
    Passive Voice: Venomous snakes have been being killed by Tom since last year.

    ---Past Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: When they had gone Argentina they saw an acrobat.
    Passive Voice: Argentina had been gone by them and saw an acrobat.

    ---Past Continuous Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: My father had been teaching me an Arabic language since I was a child.
    Passive Voice: An Arabic language had been being taught by my father since I was a child.
    Should I write “being” during the passive voice for past/present continuous perfect tense?

    ---Future Continuous Tense---
    Active Voice: by the time my friend gets money he will be going to his country.
    Passive Voice: by the time some money is gotten by my brother he will be going to his country.
    Last edited by Atchan; 25-Jun-2010 at 12:03.

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    #2

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    Not a teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    I understood what my friends begged or encouraged me. So, thanks to them.

    ---Present Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: Holland have won over Cameroon today. >> Sorry, it became an object of preposition.
    Passive Voice: Cameroon have been won by Holland yesterday.
    Though Holland and Cameroon are common nouns which contain a group of players, should I use a plural verb just like “have”?

    This is a difference between British and American English. Americans tend to think collective nouns take a singular verb. The Brits think otherwise. Congress is, but Parliament are.

    In America, we would simply say "Holland won over Cameroon today." Or "Holland has won."




    ---Present continuous Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: Tom has been killing venomous snakes since last year.
    Passive Voice: Venomous snakes have been being killed by Tom since last year.

    OK

    ---Past Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: When they had gone to Argentina they saw an acrobat.
    Passive Voice: Argentina had been gone by them and saw an acrobat.

    No, Argentina is not "been gone by them." If you really need to make this passive, I would say "An acrobat was seen by them when they had gone to Argentina."





    ---Past Continuous Perfect Tense---
    Active Voice: My father had been teaching me an Arabic language since I was a child.
    Passive Voice: An Arabic language had been being taught by my father since I was a child.
    Should I write “being” during the passive voice for past/present continuous perfect tense?

    I think the first should be "has been teaching," unless he stopped teaching you. It's still an unnatural wording. If the action stopped, I would say "My father taught me Arabic when I was a child."

    [Not sure about "an" Arabic language. Is there more than one? I thought Arabic was Arabic.]

    The second needs to include you. "Arabic has been taught to me by my father since I was a child."


    ---Future Continuous Tense---
    Active Voice: by the time my friend gets money he will be going to his country.
    Passive Voice: by the time some money is gotten by my brother he will be going to his country.

    "When" is simpler. When my friend gets some money, he will be going back to his country.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    Remember what I told you about not using the -ing forms for verbs. Don't try to make passive sentences with the progressive forms. They will rarely sound natural.

    Let's try these with simpler sentences again, okay? I'm going to help you by putting the direct object of the active sentences in italics. Those form the subject of the passive sentences.

    Active Voice: Holland beat Cameroon today.
    Passive Voice:

    Active Voice: Tom has killed four venomous snakes near here.
    Passive Voice:

    Active Voice: 10,000 people saw the acrobat at the circus.
    Passive Voice:

    Active Voice: Teachers use this room to teach chemistry.
    Passive Voice:
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Remember what I told you about not using the -ing forms for verbs. Don't try to make passive sentences with the progressive forms. They will rarely sound natural.
    Not to use passive tense during every -ing (gerund) for verbs? but when I use it my father doesn't prevent me of doing this.

    Let's try these with simpler sentences again, okay? I'm going to help you by putting the direct object of the active sentences in italics. Those form the subject of the passive sentences.

    Active Voice: Holland beat Cameroon today.
    Passive Voice: Cameroon was beaten by Holland.

    Active Voice: Tom has killed four venomous snakes near here.
    Passive Voice: Four venomous snakes has been killed near here by Tom.
    Four venomous snakes, "snakes" is the object here, but why you followed four venomous, in spite I followed venomous in my last sentences.

    Active Voice: 10,000 people saw the acrobat at the circus.
    Passive Voice: The acrobat was seen by 10,000 people at the circus.

    Active Voice: Teachers use this room to teach chemistry.
    Passive Voice: This room is used by teachers to teach chemistry.
    see above!
    Last edited by Atchan; 25-Jun-2010 at 12:02.

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    #5

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    You may want to take a look here: Using Passive Voice (#1), by Dennis Oliver - Free English Grammar Lessons

    Note the * next to Present Perfect Progressive, Past Perfect Progressive, and Future Perfect Progressive. The * has a note that reads: Passives for the progressive forms of perfect tenses are not very common and are actually rather awkward. They should be used sparingly and carefully.

    I spoke too broadly. It's not ALL progressive forms (the -ing forms) but the perfect tenses: I have been singing, I had been singing, I will have been singing. These don't work in the passive very well.

    Is it possible to make them passive? Yes it is possible. Will it sound natural? No, it will not!

    The only mistake I saw in your sentences is that snakes is plural, so you need the plural form of the verb. Not snakes has, but snakes _____.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    Here are some "ing" forms that do work.

    Present: People are placing bets on how long the celebrity marriage will last.
    Passive:
    (Note: This is a good example of when you omit who is doing the action.)

    Present: There were serving dinner just as I arrived.
    Passive:
    (Note: This is another example of when you omit who is doing the action.)

    Present: Thank you, I don't need a ride. My friend is meeting me.
    Passive:
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Here are some "ing" forms that do work.

    Present: People are placing bets on how long the celebrity marriage will last.
    Passive: Bets are being placed on how the celebrity marriage will last.
    (Note: This is a good example of when you omit who is doing the action.)

    Present: They were serving dinner just as I arrived.
    Passive: Dinner were being served just as I arrived.
    (Note: This is another example of when you omit who is doing the action.)

    Present: Thank you, I don't need a ride. My friend is meeting me.
    Passive: Thank you, I am being met by my friend so I don't need a ride.
    Really, changing (-ing verbs) into passive tense seem too hard and usually when I write them I do a lot of mistakes.

    I'm grateful to you, you were helping me until you understood me its principle. Finally I got all the idea about the passive tense.
    Thank you so much.

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    #8

    Re: 10 Simple sentences (2)

    I'm so glad to hear that!

    I think you were just working with really complicated sentences too soon. It would be like being frustrated with algebra before you felt really good about how to do multiplication.

    I just googled passive voice practice sheets and got a many hits. Some of them looked better than others, but you might find some that help you.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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