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    #1

    Buck-a -bone

    Dear all,

    In the following sentence,

    "The National Buck-A-Bone Rib Fest"...

    What is the meaning of "Buck-A-Bone"?

    Thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Buck-a -bone

    Wow. I had no idea. Thank goodness google is my friend.

    A buck is $1.
    "Ribs" refers to barbecued spareribs, where the meat is still attached to the bones and they are served still attached to each other in a rack.

    A buck a bone means that you pay $1 for each bone in the rack of ribs.

    (Have you ever eaten ribs? It might make sense if you have. I personally find it really messy.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Buck-a -bone

    Mmmmmmmmmmmmm.....barbecued ribs. In my area as soon as the weather gets warm enough, folks fire up their outdoor grills and throw slabs of ribs on the grill. They're slowly basted with a variety of "secret" sauces (every chef has his own sauce recipe) and the aroma permeates the air. Even if you've just eaten a filling lunch, you step outside and smell those barbecued ribs your neighbor is cooking and get hungry all over again.

    If you're lazy or aren't friendly enough with your neighbors so that they'll invite you over for ribs, you buy your ribs from a restaurant. Usually barbecued ribs are sold by the slab or half-slab, but in each case the vendor will specify how many bones are included in either the full or half slab (more bones means a longer slab). So a fundraising barbecue might charge "a buck a bone" or one dollar per bone for its ribs. That means that for six dollars, you'd get a slab of ribs with six bones in it. Barb is right, barbecued ribs are very messy, but sometimes a person just has to grab a pile of napkins and indulge.
    Last edited by Ouisch; 25-Jun-2010 at 19:19.

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: Buck-a -bone

    You know, I really love this forum. We don't only learn but we ENJOY too because you are so friendly you guys.

    THANKS for you both. It's clear now yes

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