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    #1

    Question The sentence suggests...?

    I can't understand what this sentence in bold suggests.
    I think I've had a bit too much sun today - I've got a headache.

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    #2

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nudrat Nazeer View Post
    I can't understand what this sentence in bold suggests.
    I think I've had a bit too much sun today - I've got a headache.
    When you are outside on a sunny day, you can say that you are "getting some sun". In the past, this would be "had some sun". It suggests that the person has been out in sunny weather for too long and, as a result, has a headache. "A bit" = "a little"

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    #3

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    When you are outside on a sunny day, you can say that you are "getting some sun". In the past, this would be "had some sun". It suggests that the person has been out in sunny weather for too long and, as a result, has a headache. "A bit" = "a little"
    Can we say "There's too much sun today."?

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    #4

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nudrat Nazeer View Post
    Can we say "There's too much sun today."?
    Grammatically, it's OK but we wouldn't normally say it. "Too much" is rather subjective here. You could say "It's very sunny today" or "It's too sunny to sit outside" or something similar.

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    #5

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Grammatically, it's OK but we wouldn't normally say it. "Too much" is rather subjective here. You could say "It's very sunny today" or "It's too sunny to sit outside" or something similar.
    When we say " We have heavy rains in winter.", why wouldn't we say " We have so much or too much or a lot of sun in June etc."? Similarly, when we can say " There's a lot of rain in winter.", why can't we say " There is a lot of sun today etc."?

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    #6

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nudrat Nazeer View Post
    When we say " We have heavy rains in winter.", why wouldn't we say " We have so much or too much or a lot of sun in June etc."? Similarly, when we can say " There's a lot of rain in winter.", why can't we say " There is a lot of sun today etc."?
    Let me see if I can work out the slight difference. It's true that we might say "There's a lot of sun in the summer" but to me that means "There are a lot of sunny days in the summer" which is a little different. I think it's just the use of "today".

    You're right - I might say "There was a lot of rain today" because rain is sort of measurable! I'll be honest, I can't really explain why I probably wouldn't say "There's a lot of sun today" - maybe it's just an anomaly with sun.

    There's a lot of snow today. (It is snowing a lot today)
    There's a lot of rain today. (It's raining a lot today)
    There's a lot of cloud today. (It's very cloudy today)
    There's a lot of fog today. (It's very foggy today)

    BUT... for some reason, I would say "It's very sunny today" and not "There's a lot of sun". The only thing I can think is that the other weather types are sort of "tangible" (and also changeable), whereas the sun is just always there and it's either visible or it's not.

    I don't think that was a very good explanation, for which I apologise!!!

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    #7

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nudrat Nazeer View Post
    Can we say "There's too much sun today."?
    Not a teacher.

    No, not the same thing. There could be a lot of sun today, but I stayed inside.

    The original sentence is that "I'v had a bit too much sun today" meaning that the speaker was out in the sun for too long.

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    #8

    Re: The sentence suggests...?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Let me see if I can work out the slight difference. It's true that we might say "There's a lot of sun in the summer" but to me that means "There are a lot of sunny days in the summer" which is a little different. I think it's just the use of "today".

    You're right - I might say "There was a lot of rain today" because rain is sort of measurable! I'll be honest, I can't really explain why I probably wouldn't say "There's a lot of sun today" - maybe it's just an anomaly with sun.

    There's a lot of snow today. (It is snowing a lot today)
    There's a lot of rain today. (It's raining a lot today)
    There's a lot of cloud today. (It's very cloudy today)
    There's a lot of fog today. (It's very foggy today)

    BUT... for some reason, I would say "It's very sunny today" and not "There's a lot of sun". The only thing I can think is that the other weather types are sort of "tangible" (and also changeable), whereas the sun is just always there and it's either visible or it's not.

    I don't think that was a very good explanation, for which I apologise!!!
    Your explanation was awesome. You've been very helpful. Thanks ever such a lot!

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