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    #1

    on the dotted line

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.

    on the dotted line =

    dotted line = broken line traditionally appearing at the bottom of a legal document, indicating the place for one's signature; place signature ( on paper )

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on the dotted line

    Yes, you're right!

    dotted

    [I am not a teacher]

    Vil... I have trouble understanding the meaning of this:

    standing four feet ten in one sock

    Could you please shed some light on it?

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    #3

    Re: on the dotted line

    Hi Offroad,

    Here is my interpretation of the phrase in question:

    standing four feet ten in one sock = in her height of almost 5 feet in her socks only (barefoot)
    (negligee in the bed)

    standing in full height

    Regards,

    V.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: on the dotted line

    Actually, wearing "only one sock" sounds to me that he is trying to describe her in the morning, a bit cloudy, not really focused. I'm not the best morning person either; it's easy to imagine me wandering around in only one sock until I got the coffee going, had a shower, etc. Then I'm myself again.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: on the dotted line

    Vil,

    Here is my interpretation of the phrase in question:

    standing four feet ten in one sock = standing 4 ft 10 in 1 sock.

    what's 4 ft 10?

    Don't get it!

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: on the dotted line

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    Vil,

    Here is my interpretation of the phrase in question:

    standing four feet ten in one sock = standing 4 ft 10 in 1 sock.

    what's 4 ft 10?

    Don't get it!
    4 ft 10 refers to her height, it means that she is four feet, 10 inches tall. (1.4732 meters for you folks on the metric system; I leave it to you to convert it further to centimers. )

    And usually in AmE we'd say "standing four feet 10 in her stocking feet." Unless there is a further meaning to the "one sock" scenario that I'm missing. (Is she taller when standing on one foot than on the other? Is her name Eileen? )

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: on the dotted line

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    4 ft 10 refers to her height, it means that she is four feet, 10 inches tall. (1.4732 meters for you folks on the metric system; I leave it to you to convert it further to centimers. )

    And usually in AmE we'd say "standing four feet 10 in her stocking feet." Unless there is a further meaning to the "one sock" scenario that I'm missing. (Is she taller when standing on one foot than on the other? Is her name Eileen? )
    Ha...

    Are You kidding me? How come I didn't notice that 'in' stands for 'inch' not 'in' preposition!?

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: on the dotted line

    Right, sorry - I forget that "4'10" in her stocking feet" is not a common expression elsewhere. But the image of her having only ONE sock shows that she may be a bit like me in the morning -- not entirely pulled together (but still cute!).
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: on the dotted line

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    Ha...

    Are You kidding me? How come I didn't notice that 'in' stands for 'inch' not 'in' preposition!?
    Usually abbreviations have periods behind them to indicate that they are, in fact, abbreviations. So Eileen's height should have been properly written as "4 ft. 10 in. tall". But some abbreviations have become so common (in some languages, that is) that writers often don't use the periods.

  8. Offroad's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: on the dotted line

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Usually abbreviations have periods behind them to indicate that they are, in fact, abbreviations. So Eileen's height should have been properly written as "4 ft. 10 in. tall". But some abbreviations have become so common (in some languages, that is) that writers often don't use the periods.
    Actually, Ouisch, I can't remember when I last saw abbreviations with periods. I just couldn't see what was just before my eyes, I thought 'in' was a preposition in that case.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    4 ft 10 refers to her height, it means that she is four feet, 10 inches tall. (1.4732 meters for you folks on the metric system; I leave it to you to convert it further to centimers. )
    Yes... Despite the fact that I am a (work as a) technician, couldn't see it.

    Offroad

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