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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    pissed off

    Dear friends...

    I have come across several adjectives (some of them are offensive) that sometimes have different meanings depending where they are used, (UK and other places).

    One of them is 'pissed off', which in the US, they usually omit the preposition 'off'.

    My question:

    Does 'pissed [off]' mean 'annoyed' and/or 'drunk' in the UK?

    Many thanks

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    #2

    Re: pissed off

    I think they have the same meaning in US/UK/Aust.

    pissed off - annoyed
    piss off - go away
    pissed - drunk
    piss - urinate

    The slang words are supposed to be uncouth language.

    not a teacher
    Last edited by tedtmc; 01-Jul-2010 at 04:24.

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: pissed off

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    I think they have the same meaning in US/UK/Aust.
    That's what I thought (first), but then a friend from MO/US disagreed. So I am asking the teachers.

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    #4

    Re: pissed off

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    That's what I thought (first), but then a friend from MO/US disagreed. So I am asking the teachers.
    The Aussies and Kiwis especially, like to use those phrases. Probably not so much in US.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: pissed off

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    I think they have the same meaning in US/UK/Aust.

    pissed off - annoyed
    piss off - go away
    pissed - drunk
    piss - urinate

    The slang words are supposed to be uncouth language.

    not a teacher
    That's how I'd use them. However, "pissed" can also mean annoyed or angry, esp. in AmE.
    I'm not sure whether they use it this way in UK.

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: pissed off

    In AmE, "pissed" (which is still considered by some folks to be a vulagarity, even though it is now frequently used on TV shows and such) means to be angry, upset or frustrated. It is rarely, if ever, used to describe someone who is drunk.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: pissed off

    Echoing what Ouisch just said, if you told a typical American that someone was pissed, the idea of being drunk would not occur to most of us. We would immediately assume you meant angry.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #8

    Re: pissed off

    I only just recently learned the "pissed" = "drunk" euphemism for non-American forms of English, and I'm 26! I was following a thread on another message board, and it came up in conversation as one of those "potentially embarassing things to say overseas" lines. So, yes, "pissed" or "pissed off," in American English, is strictly used for anger, not drunkenness.

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    #9

    Re: pissed off

    Quote Originally Posted by Heterological View Post
    I only just recently learned the "pissed" = "drunk" euphemism for non-American forms of English, and I'm 26! I was following a thread on another message board, and it came up in conversation as one of those "potentially embarassing things to say overseas" lines. So, yes, "pissed" or "pissed off," in American English, is strictly used for anger, not drunkenness.
    To avoid confusion you could say, I'm ticked off.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: pissed off

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    To avoid confusion you could say, I'm ticked off.
    Yes, or for even more clarity, you could say, "I'm angry and annoyed, but I'm not drunk".

    By the way, 'pissed' as in 'drunk' is often expressed as:
    "pissed as a parrot", "pissed as a newt". (Don't ask me why.)

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