Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 212
    #1

    based on

    Based on new evidence, the investigation of the Al Gore's sex assault case will be re-opened.

    Based on new evidence, investigators will re-open the case.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    My question is: the second sentence seems to have a dangled participle 'based on.... '. Is it acceptacle?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #2

    Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by LiuJing View Post
    Based on new evidence, the investigation of the Al Gore's sex assault case will be re-opened.

    Based on new evidence, investigators will re-open the case.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    My question is: the second sentence seems to have a dangled participle 'based on.... '. Is it acceptacle?

    Thank you.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, LiuJing.

    (1) As you know, native speakers woud have no problem with

    either sentence and would pay no attention to the dangling

    participle.

    (2) Serious students such as you make us native speakers pay

    more attention, and that's a good thing.

    (3) Yes, it is only my opinion that your first sentence is correct.

    In other words, "based on new evidence" modifies the noun

    "investigation."

    (4) Yes, it is only my opinion that you are 100% correct: the participle

    in the second sentence is "dangling." That is, the investigators cannot

    be based on new evidence.

    (a) After checking some sources, I have come to the conclusion that

    maybe (maybe) there are three ways to rewrite it in "good" English:

    (i) Because of new evidence, investigators will reopen the case.

    (ii) Based on new evidence, the case will be reopened by investigators.

    (iii) The investigators' decision to reopen the case is based on new

    evidence. / The investigators' reopening of the case is based on new

    evidence.

    (a) In (iii), I learned a wonderful phrase that you may be interested in:

    "phantom noun." That is, I had to find a noun for "based on new

    evidence" to modify.

    ***** Thank you for your question *****

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 212
    #3

    Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, LiuJing.

    (1) As you know, native speakers woud have no problem with

    either sentence and would pay no attention to the dangling

    participle.

    (2) Serious students such as you make us native speakers pay

    more attention, and that's a good thing.

    (3) Yes, it is only my opinion that your first sentence is correct.

    In other words, "based on new evidence" modifies the noun

    "investigation."

    (4) Yes, it is only my opinion that you are 100% correct: the participle

    in the second sentence is "dangling." That is, the investigators cannot

    be based on new evidence.

    (a) After checking some sources, I have come to the conclusion that

    maybe (maybe) there are three ways to rewrite it in "good" English:

    (i) Because of new evidence, investigators will reopen the case.

    (ii) Based on new evidence, the case will be reopened by investigators.

    (iii) The investigators' decision to reopen the case is based on new

    evidence. / The investigators' reopening of the case is based on new

    evidence.

    (a) In (iii), I learned a wonderful phrase that you may be interested in:

    "phantom noun." That is, I had to find a noun for "based on new

    evidence" to modify.

    ***** Thank you for your question *****


    Thank you for your wonderful reply. There is no book that lists 'based on' as an absolute dangler, is it?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: based on

    LiuJing,

    Thank you for your kind note.

    I do not know of any books that discuss "based on" as a dangling participle.

    But there are many articles on the World Wide Web. I think that some of

    the articles are very authoritative. For example, the term "phantom noun"

    comes from a lesson offered by Yale University -- one of our best universities.

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #5

    Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (1) As you know, native speakers would have no problem with
    either sentence and would pay no attention to the dangling
    participle.
    That sounds like a rather sweeping generalisation. Perhaps you inadvertently left out "most" before "native speakers". As you might have noticed we have a few strict old-fashioined prescriptivists on the forum lately.
    (Also, if LiuJing knew that, I guess s/he wouldn't have asked.)

    I don't have a problem with either of those sentences.


    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 8
    #6

    Re: based on

    I have another correction:
    "Basing on new evidence, investigators will re-open the case."

    What do you think?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #7

    Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by johnmattrick View Post
    I have another correction:
    "Basing on new evidence, investigators will re-open the case."

    What do you think?
    Terrible.
    By the way, where's Sinhuk?


    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 8
    #8

    Smile Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Terrible.
    By the way, where's Sinhuk?
    Huh? Terrible? Why? I think it's the reduction form of relative clause using present participle. It must be that people usually don't use it.

    Where's Sinhuk? Google it. ^^

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #9

    Re: based on

    Quote Originally Posted by johnmattrick View Post
    Huh? Terrible? Why? I think it's the reduction form of relative clause using present participle. It must be that people usually don't use it.

    Where's Sinhuk? Google it. ^^
    Maybe, but "Basing what on new evidence? ..." It could have read: "Basing their ideas on new evidence, investigators will re-open the case." But it doesn't.

    By the way, I did Google Sinhuk,or course, but I'm none the wiser about it's status as a national entity with Twain as an official language.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 577
    #10

    Re: based on

    Quite a few dangling participles are so commonly used, especially at the beginning of sentences, that they have become idiomatic and are recognised as prepositions, eg 'considering', 'regarding', 'given' (and quite a few more if you google 'marginal prepositions').

    I don't think 'based on', as used in your second sentence, is quite there yet. There are still some who consider 'based' to be a dangling participle here, whilst others have no problem seeing 'based on' as a complex preposition. ('Judging from' is, I think, another phrase somewhere in between the two camps, whereas 'according to', for example, is fully recognised as a preposition.) That said, I think its use as a preposition simply meaning 'on the basis of' is so widespread that its acceptance as an established idiom can't be far off.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] based on...
    By yeamaozi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2009, 02:28
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2008, 09:19
  3. based on .....
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Oct-2008, 04:47
  4. based on
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2006, 15:05
  5. based on
    By mengta in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2005, 12:06

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •