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    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    of

    Molly wears blue jeans but Lydia wears a skirt of red.
    Molly wears blue jeans but Lydia wears a skirt of red spot patten.

    Does it sound natural?

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    #2

    Re: of

    try red skirt and red-spotted skirt

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #3

    Re: of

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Does it sound natural?
    It's poetic, but aside from artistic license, "skirt of red" comes across as a direct translation from another language. Try simplicity. Symmetry is beauty:

    Adjective + Noun, Adjective + Noun
    blue jeans, red skirt

    Noun + Prepositional Pharse, Noun + Prepositional Phrase
    jeans of blue, skirt of red


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #4

    Re: of

    I see. Thank you, mykwyner and Cass!

  2. Steven D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: of

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    It's poetic, but aside from artistic license, "skirt of red" comes across as a direct translation from another language. Try simplicity. Symmetry is beauty:

    Adjective + Noun, Adjective + Noun
    blue jeans, red skirt

    Noun + Prepositional Pharse, Noun + Prepositional Phrase
    jeans of blue, skirt of red
    Would you say it has to be symmetrical?

    How about this one? Molly wears bluejeans, but Lydia wears a red skirt with spots.

    I think "bluejeans" is better than "blue jeans". If it's "blue jeans" then "jeans" is accented somewhat more. If it's "bluejeans", then "blue" sounds stronger and higher, and that's how it's typically pronounced. That's how I hear it. The same thing goes for "website" and "web site". Think about "greenhouse" compared to "green house". They're bluejeans to me. - blue sky - blue jeans - bluejeans

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=8&q=bluejeans

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: of

    I dunno. "She wears a skirt with spots" seems to express to me that she wears the skirt only when she wears spots. That is, the two (skirt and spots) are exclusive. Why not, "She wears a spotted skirt or a skirt that has spots?

    I like your compounding idea.

  4. Steven D's Avatar
    Senior Member
    English Teacher

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    #7

    Re: of

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    I dunno. "She wears a skirt with spots" seems to express to me that she wears the skirt only when she wears spots. That is, the two (skirt and spots) are exclusive. Why not, "She wears a spotted skirt or a skirt that has spots?

    I like your compounding idea.

    I seriously doubt anyone would understand the sentence to mean that she wears a skirt only when she wears spots. For someone to understand the sentence in that way, he/she would have to think it's possible for her to wear spots without the red skirt. This brings to mind a few questions: Where does one buy "spots"? Do others wear spots? Can you make spots?

    She wears a red skirt with spots. - The skirt is red and it has spots.

    I dunno.
    Okay, then I would like to say that I know. A sentence such as this doesn't have to be symmetrical. I agree that symmetry does make for better sentences quite often. However, taking symmetry into consideration in the context of expressing such an ordinary and simple idea is really an unnecessary burden in my opinion. Spoken language? And what if the speaker feels it's absolutely necessary to inform the listener that the red skirt also has spots? Should we recommend that the speaker withhold information in order to maintain symmetry? I think such symmetry is really rather rigid in the context of spontaneous spoken language.

    She wears a red skirt that has spots. Would you say this is better than "with spots"?



    I like your compounding idea.
    Thank you.

  5. Steven D's Avatar
    Senior Member
    English Teacher

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    #8

    Re: of

    She wears a red spotted skirt.

  6. Steven D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: of

    Why not, "She wears a spotted skirt or a skirt that has spots?
    Okay, that's fine for me, but what about "red"? The skirt is red as well.

    I still really don't see the problem with "red skirt with spots". I don't think anyone would take that to mean that the skirt and the spots are separate. Technically, someone could take it to mean that, but that's technically. In terms of what is practical, there's no chance of that happening.
    Last edited by Steven D; 31-May-2005 at 19:45.

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    #10

    Re: of

    I see no problem with 'red skirt with spots', but doesn't the original mean a 'skirt with red spots'?

    BTW Do you say 'bluejeans' in the States? I think I would keep them separate and use the colour to say they're not black, etc.

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