Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    HighPriest is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    29

    difference in stress?

    Is there a marked difference in pronunciation of "girlfriend" and "girl friend"? Would it be clear that I am talking about a female friend of mine if I stress the word "friend" in "girl friend"?

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,741

    Re: difference in stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by HighPriest View Post
    Is there a marked difference in pronunciation of "girlfriend" and "girl friend"? Would it be clear that I am talking about a female friend of mine if I stress the word "friend" in "girl friend"?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, HighPriest.

    (1) Hopefully, a teacher will soon answer you.

    (2) I found this in one of my grammar books that MAY (possibility)

    help you:

    (a) We ate a HOT dog. = we ate that popular American sandwich.

    (b) We chased a hot DOG. = the dog was hot.

    If we said: We ate a hot DOG, that would not be considered a nice

    thing to do here in the United States.

    And if we said: We chased a HOT dog, that would mean we were

    chasing that sandwich!!!

    (3) So I think (only my opinion) that you are correct:

    Tom: Hey, buddy, don't go to the dance with Martha.

    George: Why not?

    Tom: Because she is my GIRLfriend! That's why not! Keep away!!!

    *****

    Sue: Are you going to marry Mona?

    Ralph: No way!!! She is just a girl FRIEND. Nothing more!

    ***** Thank you for the question *****

    P. S. I think that most people would simply say:

    She is just a female FRIEND.

  3. #3
    HighPriest is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    29

    Re: difference in stress?

    Thanks a lot! Who needs a teacher when I got such a comprehensive reply from you?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    25,679

    Re: difference in stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by HighPriest View Post
    Is there a marked difference in pronunciation of "girlfriend" and "girl friend"? Would it be clear that I am talking about a female friend of mine if I stress the word "friend" in "girl friend"?
    Native speaking men do not refer to their female non-girlfriend friends as "girl friends". However, women talk about their girlfriends, meaning their non-sexual friends.
    The pronunciation is the same.

    "Female friend" is a common term. If there's some doubt, you can say, "She's just a friend".
    It's possible that some men say, "She's just a girl friend, not a girlfriend", but I've never heard it.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,916

    Re: difference in stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    ...
    It's possible that some men say, "She's just a girl friend, not a girlfriend", but I've never heard it.
    I do - or at least did, in the days when there might have been any doubt about my meaning ). But I agree about women using 'girlfriend' with a non-sexual meaning. In fact, the asexuality is such a strong implication that a lesbian lover would be called 'partner' or 'significant other' - if the speaker wanted to advertise the fact.

    b

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •