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Thread: "Study law"?

  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "Study law"?

    Hi,
    In order for one to become a lawyer, should they study law? I mean is that the right collocation?

    How about doing in articles?


    Thanks.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Study law"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    In order for one to become a lawyer, should they study law? I mean is that the right collocation?

    How about doing in articles?


    Thanks.
    Yes, to "study law" is correct.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Study law"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    In order for one to become a lawyer, should they study law? I mean is that the right collocation?

    How about doing in articles?

    Thanks.
    What did you mean by 'doing in'?

  4. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Study law"?

    One is reading Law is very idiomatic. It may go one is a postgraduate in Law and one is taking a Law degree as well. Those sentences could be followed by from a university (eg from Oxford)
    Last edited by philadelphia; 04-Jul-2010 at 18:47.

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    #5

    Re: "Study law"?

    In the US, we'd probably just say "I'm in law school."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "Study law"?

    You may be thinking of articling or doing articles, meaning you're a slave for a more established lawyer for a year.

  7. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "Study law"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    What did you mean by 'doing in'?


    Oh, sorry...that's supposed to be doing/in articles...which must be used in British English...

  8. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #8

    Re: "Study law"?

    Doing/in articles are used in British English.

  9. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "Study law"?

    But 'study/read law' are also used in Br Eng. If you're studying/reading law, the implication is that you're at college or university. If you're 'in articles', you have left college or university but you're not yet fully fledged. The 'slave' that K mentioned is - in the case of a trainee barrister (an advocate in court) called a 'pupil'; the time spent as a pupil is called 'pupillage'.

    b

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    #10

    Re: "Study law"?

    Does every law school graduate have to do this? Like an intern year for a doctor?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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