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    • Join Date: Jul 2010
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    #1

    did/done?

    When congratulating one on their examination results; which of the following is correct:

    You did excellently in your exams

    Or

    You have done excellently in your exams.

    Further, does this change when referring to a person by their name or gender? For example:

    1. Steve has done excellently in his exams/Steve did excellently in his exams.

    2. He has done excellently in his exams/He did excellently in his exams.

  1. 2010's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: did/done?

    Quote Originally Posted by Have-a-break View Post
    When congratulating one on their examination results; which of the following is correct:

    You did excellently in your exams

    Or

    You have done excellently in your exams.

    Further, does this change when referring to a person by their name or gender? For example:

    1. Steve has done excellently in his exams/Steve did excellently in his exams.

    2. He has done excellently in his exams/He did excellently in his exams.
    ===Not a teacher===

    This is an interesting topic always to discuss.

    All your sentences are correct. When you use them is what matters.

    Past tense (did): The time period is finished. (He probably does not have any more exams)

    Present perfect (done): The time period has not finished. (He might have another exam(S))

    EXAMPLES:

    The present perfect is used when the time is not specific: I have seen that movie already.

    (We don't know when.)

    The simple past is used when the time is clear: I saw that movie on Thursday.

    (We know exactly when.)

    The present perfect is often used when giving recent news: Martin has crashed his car again.

    (This is new information.)

    The simple past is used when giving older information: Martin crashed his car last year.

    (This is old information.)

    The present perfect is used with for and since, when the actions have not finished yet: I have lived in Victoria for five years.

    (I still live in Victoria.)

    The simple past is used with for and since, when the actions have already finished: I lived in Victoria for five years.

    (I don't live in Victoria now.)
    Last edited by 2010; 06-Jul-2010 at 18:08. Reason: Typo

  2. kfredson's Avatar

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 700
    #3

    Re: did/done?

    Thank you, 2010. You make many excellent points there and provide fine examples. I would only suggest that it can in some cases be fine to use the simple past when dealing with an event that has happened recently.

    Hey, Joey! Max crashed into your car!

    I would suggest, as a result, that Have-A-Break's two sentences (both in 1. and 2.) could mean the same thing. It is not easy for me to tell from them whether or not the tests happened recently or a while ago, nor is it possible to tell whether or not there are more tests to come.

    I could be wrong in this and would welcome other opinions.

  3. 2010's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: did/done?

    Quote Originally Posted by kfredson View Post
    Thank you, 2010. You make many excellent points there and provide fine examples. I would only suggest that it can in some cases be fine to use the simple past when dealing with an event that has happened recently.

    Hey, Joey! Max crashed into your car!

    I would suggest, as a result, that Have-A-Break's two sentences (both in 1. and 2.) could mean the same thing. It is not easy for me to tell from them whether or not the tests happened recently or a while ago, nor is it possible to tell whether or not there are more tests to come.

    I could be wrong in this and would welcome other opinions.
    Hello kfredson,

    I would post another example, which I beleive should make this clear.

    1. He has broken the glass. (an action, which still holds good)

    Explanation: The glass might have been broken yesterday or during the last week and it still remains broken (i.e., not replaced yet with a new one).

    2. He broke the glass.

    Explanation: This statement describes an action that happened in the past. (The glass might have been replaced ever since)



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