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  1. #1
    Nathan Mckane is offline Member
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    in the charge of consequences !

    Hi dear teachers !

    My university teacher persists that this sentence is correct and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it :

    You are in the charge of consequences .

    I think this sentence is wrong . But since I'm not a native speaker of English , I'm not sure about it .

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: in the charge of consequences !

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Mckane View Post
    Hi dear teachers !

    My university teacher persists insists that this sentence is correct and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it :

    You are in the charge of consequences .

    I think this sentence is wrong but since I'm not a native speaker of English, I'm not sure about it.
    It certainly sounds very strange to me! I can't really work out what your teacher thinks it means.

    "To be in the charge of" - to be being looked after by (passive):

    Twelve children were in the charge of one teacher = There was one teacher in charge of twelve children

    "To be in charge of" - to be responsible for, to be the leader of,

    I am in charge of ordering books = I am responsible for ordering books

    "Consequences" - things that happen as a result of something else happening.

    There are dire consequences of the BP oil spill.

    I don't think it's possible to be "in charge of consequences", it's also not really possible to be "in the charge of consequences". It's possible to be "responsible for the consequences", in that you may have done something which caused the consequences to happen!

    Has your teacher said what he/she thinks it means?

    Note to you: careful with your punctuation. We don't put a space before a comma or a full stop, only after them.

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