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  1. #1
    RoseSpring's Avatar
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    Trespass/Surpass!

    Do we say:

    One souldn't trespass/ surpass his limits?

    Or there are other comon expressions?

  2. #2
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Quote Originally Posted by RoseSpring View Post
    Do we say:

    One souldn't trespass/ surpass his limits?

    Or there are other comon expressions?
    What do you think are the definitions of "trespass" and "surpass"?

  3. #3
    RoseSpring's Avatar
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    I found this meaning concerning trespass:

    Pass beyond (limits or boundaries)

  4. #4
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Could anyone help?

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Trespass is more about crossing the physical limits, of land, for instance.

    If you go onto private property without permission, then when you cross the boundary, you are guilty of trespass.

  6. #6
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    I'll try to set an example to make my point clearer:

    If for example an employee is talking to his manager. The manager begins to shout at him. Then, the employee starts to answer back. Of course, the manager will be angry and might say:

    "Don't trespass/ exceed your limits/bouderies."

    This is how I want to use the verb of trespass.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Quote Originally Posted by RoseSpring View Post
    I'll try to set an example to make my point clearer:

    If for example an employee is talking to his manager. The manager begins to shout at him. Then, the employee starts to answer back. Of course, the manager will be angry and might say:

    "Don't trespass/ exceed your limits/bouderies."

    This is how I want to use the verb of trespass.
    That's why I pointed out that "trespass" is specifically for physical boundaries! For your context, I would be inclined to think that the manager might say something like:

    Don't cross the line.
    Careful! You're in danger of crossing the boundaries of our professional relationship!

    Trespass really doesn't work here.

  8. #8
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Thanks indeed.

    Is that mean that if a person is talking to someone who is higher than him in position or social status and then he answered in impolite or in an improper way, the other person ( higher position) might say something like the one you've suggested, correct?

  9. #9
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    'overstep' is a good alternative - it actually means passing beyond a limit, especially violating an expected standard of behaviour. You can 'overstep a limit/boundary/line' and there's also the idiom 'to overstep the mark', which means to behave in an acceptable way.

  10. #10
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    Re: Trespass/Surpass!

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    'overstep' is a good alternative - it actually means passing beyond a limit, especially violating an expected standard of behaviour. You can 'overstep a limit/boundary/line' and there's also the idiom 'to overstep the mark', which means to behave in an acceptable way.

    Thanks Bertie! I was wracking my brains trying to work out what the better word was (overstep) and for some reason, it simply refused to exit my brain!

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