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  1. #1
    Daniellll is offline Member
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    To the last minute

    What do we say:
    - don't leave everything till the last minute
    OR
    - don't leave everything to the last minute
    OR
    -don't leave everything up to the last minute

    ?

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: To the last minute

    '...till...' is best;

    '...to...' is just about acceptable;

    '...up to...' is wrong.

    Rover

  3. #3
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: To the last minute

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    '...till...' is best;

    '...to...' is just about acceptable;

    '...up to...' is wrong.

    Rover
    What is the meaning of "up to" because I used it in previous sentence but it was crossed out. "up to date" is used by anti virus programs so does it mean updated.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: To the last minute

    Yes - 'up to date' means 'modern' or the latest version of a program.

    'What are you up to?' means 'What are you doing?'

    'You can borrow up to four books from the library' means 'You can borrow one, two, three or four books. . . .'

    Rover

  5. #5
    bertietheblue is offline Senior Member
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    Re: To the last minute

    Just to add, 'till' has exactly the same meaning as 'until' so you could use 'until' here - the only difference is that 'till' is more colloquial so you don't see it anywhere near as often as 'until' in writing.

  6. #6
    Atchan is offline Key Member
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    Re: To the last minute

    Quote Originally Posted by bertietheblue View Post
    Just to add, 'till' has exactly the same meaning as 'until' so you could use 'until' here - the only difference is that 'till' is more colloquial so you don't see it anywhere near as often as 'until' in writing.
    What you said is absolutely right.

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