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  1. #1
    wotcha's Avatar
    wotcha is offline Senior Member
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    'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    1. I was stolen my wallet

    2. My wallet was stolen.


    Are the both correct?

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    1. I was stolen my wallet

    2. My wallet was stolen.
    2006

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    You can also say 'I had my wallet stolen'.

    Rover

  4. #4
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    You can also say 'I had my wallet stolen'.
    Would "My wallet was stolen" be better? I was explaining the causative in the passive voice to some students the other day, and concluded that saying "I had my [object] [past participle]" implied that your permission was given.

    For example, "Our house was painted" means that at one point the house was one colour, and at another point after that it was a different colour. Permission was not necessarily given - you may have simply woken up to find your house a different colour! On the other hand, "We had our house painted" means that we asked somebody (i.e. gave them permission) to paint our house, and he/she did.

    I've heard "I've had my [object] stolen" before, but, all of a sudden, using this analysis it no longer makes sense!

  5. #5
    wotcha's Avatar
    wotcha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    Quote Originally Posted by ollieacappella View Post
    Would "My wallet was stolen" be better? I was explaining the causative in the passive voice to some students the other day, and concluded that saying "I had my [object] [past participle]" implied that your permission was given.

    For example, "Our house was painted" means that at one point the house was one colour, and at another point after that it was a different colour. Permission was not necessarily given - you may have simply woken up to find your house a different colour! On the other hand, "We had our house painted" means that we asked somebody (i.e. gave them permission) to paint our house, and he/she did.

    I've heard "I've had my [object] stolen" before, but, all of a sudden, using this analysis it no longer makes sense!

    Then.. how about 'I got my wallet stolen?' Does it sound same as 'I had my wallet stolen?' or Does it not make sense?

  6. #6
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    I would stick with My wallet was stolen. I had my wallet stolen suggests to me that the speaker got somebody to steal his wallet.



  7. #7
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    Then.. how about 'I got my wallet stolen?' Does it sound same as 'I had my wallet stolen?' or Does it not make sense?
    Using "got" isn't as common for the causative as "had". I personally try to avoid the verb "to get" at all costs anyway because I think it is overused and it is too hard to translate!

    I'm not a teacher, by the way.

  8. #8
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    Re: 'I was stolen my wallet' 'My wallet was stolen'

    Quote Originally Posted by ollieacappella View Post
    Would "My wallet was stolen" be better? I was explaining the causative in the passive voice to some students the other day, and concluded that saying "I had my [object] [past participle]" implied that your permission was given.

    For example, "Our house was painted" means that at one point the house was one colour, and at another point after that it was a different colour. Permission was not necessarily given - you may have simply woken up to find your house a different colour! On the other hand, "We had our house painted" means that we asked somebody (i.e. gave them permission) to paint our house, and he/she did.

    I've heard "I've had my [object] stolen" before, but, all of a sudden, using this analysis it no longer makes sense!
    Yes, it does sound illogical to say, "I had my wallet stolen" in place of "My wallet was stolen." Perhaps it is illogical. Nevertheless, it is a common phrase and is readily understood.
    "I knew I shouldn't have gone to that wild nightclub last night and, sure enough, I had my wallet stolen."

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