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    • Join Date: Apr 2010
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    #1

    "engagement-wise"

    What does "engagement-wise" mean in this sentence?
    So obviously, engagement-wise, Jack and Salma are not going to forge ahead.

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    #2

    Re: "engagement-wise"

    Quote Originally Posted by supernova101 View Post
    What does "engagement-wise" mean in this sentence?
    So obviously, engagement-wise, Jack and Salma are not going to forge ahead.
    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

    Hello, Supernova.

    (1) Americans love to add -wise to many words because it's

    such a short way to say something.

    (2) I think that your sentence means something like:

    As far as the engagement is concerned, it is obvious that Jack and

    Salma have decided not to make any plans at this time.

    (3) I love desserts. But health-wise, they are not the best

    possible things to eat. = not good for your health.

    (4) I love print newspapers. But business-wise, they are not doing very

    well. = Many print newspapers here in the States are losing readers and

    advertising. Some are closing down.

    (5) Tony is a nice person. But language-wise, he needs some

    improvement. = His knowledge (of grammar or literature or something

    else) is lacking badly.

    Thank you

    P. S. Some people really dislike this use of -wise.

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    #3

    Re: "engagement-wise"

    I think "when it comes to X" is often equal to "X-wise". Is that right?


    • Join Date: Apr 2010
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    #4

    Re: "engagement-wise"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

    Hello, Supernova.

    (1) Americans love to add -wise to many words because it's

    such a short way to say something.

    (2) I think that your sentence means something like:

    As far as the engagement is concerned, it is obvious that Jack and

    Salma have decided not to make any plans at this time.

    (3) I love desserts. But health-wise, they are not the best

    possible things to eat. = not good for your health.

    (4) I love print newspapers. But business-wise, they are not doing very

    well. = Many print newspapers here in the States are losing readers and

    advertising. Some are closing down.

    (5) Tony is a nice person. But language-wise, he needs some

    improvement. = His knowledge (of grammar or literature or something

    else) is lacking badly.

    Thank you

    P. S. Some people really dislike this use of -wise.
    Oh, I see Thank you!

  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "engagement-wise"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    P. S. Some people really dislike this use of -wise.
    An example for the PS;

    -Wise.

    Ad hoc words like salarywise and timewise, meaning regarding salaries or time, are best avoided. Strunk and White put it well: "The sober writer will abstain from the use of this wild additive."

    Source: Lynch, Guide to Grammar and Style — W

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "engagement-wise"

    Quote Originally Posted by euncu View Post
    An example for the PS;

    -Wise.

    Ad hoc words like salarywise and timewise, meaning regarding salaries or time, are best avoided. Strunk and White put it well: "The sober writer will abstain from the use of this wild additive."

    Source: Lynch, Guide to Grammar and Style W
    [off point comment]
    I think "The Wild Additives" sounds like a good name for a rock band. I wonder what Lynch thinks that drunken writers should use.
    [/off point comment]
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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