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  1. #1
    heyt is offline Member
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    hysteric or hysterical

    Hi,

    Could someone help me find out if there's any difference between 'hysteric' and hysterical'?


    Thank you very much,
    heyt

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Quote Originally Posted by heyt View Post
    Hi,

    Could someone help me find out if there's any difference between 'hysteric' and hysterical'?


    Thank you very much,
    heyt
    Hysteric = noun
    Hysterical = adjective

  3. #3
    euncu's Avatar
    euncu is offline Senior Member
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Hysteric = noun
    Hysterical = adjective
    Isn't the noun "hysteria" ?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Quote Originally Posted by euncu View Post
    Isn't the noun "hysteria" ?
    Sorry, I should have differentiated. Hysteria is the noun of the actual behaviour, but a person who is hysterical can be called "a hysteric". We also say, when we've been laughing very hard "I was in hysterics!"

    She is a hysteric.
    She suffers from hysteria.
    She gets hysterical.

  5. #5
    euncu's Avatar
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Sorry, I should have differentiated. Hysteria is the noun of the actual behaviour, but a person who is hysterical can be called "a hysteric". We also say, when we've been laughing very hard "I was in hysterics!"

    She is a hysteric.
    She suffers from hysteria.
    She gets hysterical.
    Thank you very much for elaborating.

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Interesting (and sexist - as so much etymology is ) link to the thread about Greek derivations: the Cl. Greek for 'womb' was ύστερος - so hysteria was originally a strictly female weakness.

    b

  7. #7
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    Re: hysteric or hysterical

    Note also the term 'histrionic'.
    This is also a behaviour type and differs in some respects to 'hysterical' behaviour.

    In psychology, 'hysteria' is classified as neurosis. 'Histrionic' behaviour generally occurs as a personality trait/disorder.
    Histrionic personality disorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    People with a histrionic personality are more likely to have 'hysterics' and possibly more likely to develop a hysterical disorder.

    Actors/actresses, show people, and entertainers often have histrionic personality types.

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