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    #1

    Comparative Adjectives

    When we use adjectives (e.g., old, important) to compare two people or two things, the adjectives have special forms:

    a) We add –er to an adjectives that have one-syllable.
    b) We use more in front of adjectives that have two or more syllable.

    What I want to talk about is syllable, what it means?

    I have checked it on the dictionary and gave me this meaning “a single unit of speech, either a whole word or one of the parts into which a word can be separated, usually containing a vowel” but I do still not understand it.

    Adjectives with one syllable
    Old >>> Older
    Cheap >>> Cheaper
    Big >>> Bigger
    What is one syllable?

    And here adjectives with two or more syllable
    Famous >>> more famous
    Important >>> more important
    Interesting >>> more interesting
    Can you point to the syllables that are in these words?

    I know everything relating to comparative adjectives except syllables which need for explanation.


    Thank you in advance.

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    #2

    Re: Comparative Adjectives

    What is one syllable?
    You seem to be confusing comparitives with syllables. Old, older, and oldest are ways of comparing things - while each has certain syllables, they are not syllables.

    So what do think of this
    Cheap >>> Cheaper
    Does it has one-syllable? I think two che - ap. I hope that I'm wrong.

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    #3

    Re: Comparative Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Cheap - er (Two syllables)
    Cheap (One syllable)

    Get away from the idea that syllables have anything to do with comparsions - they don't.

    Establishment: es - tab - lish - ment. Four syllables.
    Disestablishing: dis - es- tab - lish - ing. Five syllables
    Rather: rath - er or rah - ther. Two syllables

    Syllables are about how words are pronounced.
    OK my teacher I will get away from this idea because I thought that its necessary. Some English books say its necessary while the others do not pay attention to this rule (as they say). So I will continue my studying.

    Thank you for your help

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    #4

    Re: Comparative Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by atchan View Post
    When we use adjectives (e.g., old, important) to compare two people or two things, the adjectives have special forms:</p>
    a) We add –er to an adjectives that have one-syllable.
    b) We use more in front of adjectives that have two or more syllable.
    </p>

    You're right.
    We can't call it a rule, but most of English adjectives follow that pattern.
    The syllable is a rather complicated linguistic concept. It won't help you much in your studies. But, it wouldn't hurt to know some things about it: we expect a syllable to have a vowel, and/or one or two consonants that may come before or after the vowel. So a one-syllable word is a word that has at least one vowel.

    -Red = r + e + d -----> consonant + vowel + consonant
    -old = o + l + d -----> vowel + consonant +consonant

    These words are short, so we attach an -er to them for comparison:
    -old + er

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    #5

    Re: Comparative Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by chester_100 View Post
    </p>

    You're right.
    We can't call it a rule, but most of English adjectives follow that pattern.
    The syllable is a rather complicated linguistic concept. It won't help you much in your studies. But, it wouldn't hurt to know some things about it: we expect a syllable to have a vowel, and/or one or two consonants that may come before or after the vowel. So a one-syllable word is a word that has at least one vowel.

    -Red = r + e + d -----> consonant + vowel + consonant
    -old = o + l + d -----> vowel + consonant +consonant

    These words are short, so we attach an -er to them for comparison:
    -old + er
    Its nice to learn it and will not hurt us as a student, but it really confuses most students. In the first I thought its a rule but know I realized that its a rubbish.

    As the teacher Gillnetter said
    "Get away from the idea that syllables have anything to do with comparsions - they don't".

    Really its nice words.

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