Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    heyt is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    110

    toiletries shop

    Hello,

    In Hungarian we use a given word for a shop that sells cosmetics and toiletries, and I would like to ask someone if there is a word for it in English as well, or if we should say ' a cosmetics and toiletries shop'.

    Thank you very much,
    heyt

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,130

    Re: toiletries shop

    In the US, such a shop would be called a "drug store." Grocery stores and department stores (such as Wal-Mart) also sell cosmetics and toiletries, but if a person wants a large variety of shampoos and soaps and eye shadow and lipstick and such from which to choose, he or she would go to a drug store.

  3. #3
    heyt is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    110

    Re: toiletries shop

    Thank you very much.

    Is drug store also the place where you can buy prescribed medicine?

    In Hungary, shops that sell cosmetics and toiletres sell only medicine that are not prescribed drugs.

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    13,531

    Re: toiletries shop

    Not a teacher.

    "Pharmacy" is the fancy American word, but "drug store" is common as well.

    In Britain, they call it a "chemist."

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,324

    Re: toiletries shop

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not a teacher.

    "Pharmacy" is the fancy American word, but "drug store" is common as well.

    In Britain, they call it a "chemist."
    It's not quite as simple as that in the UK. A chemist's is mainly where you go to get prescription medication. Smaller ones literally only do that, and sell a small amount of non-prescription medication, things like First Aid items, condoms etc. Larger ones do stock toiletries, though not necessarily cosmetics.

    Then you get to the chain store variety (Boots, for instance, which used to be called "Boots the Chemists") which do everything: prescriptions, opticians, cosmetics, toiletries, some electrical items (hairdryers etc) and even food and drink.

    A shop which only sells toiletries and cosmetics, but no drugs? I can't think of a word which would describe such a shop. We would generally have to refer to it by the specific company name.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 19-Jul-2010 at 01:33. Reason: Typo

  6. #6
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    13,531

    Re: toiletries shop

    Thanks. I wasn't sure if the British "chemists" had expanded their offerings like the drug stores in America. Some of them here even sell beer and milk and have blurred the line between drug store and supermarket.

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    13,531

    Re: toiletries shop

    Quote Originally Posted by heyt View Post
    Thank you very much.

    Is drug store also the place where you can buy prescribed medicine?

    In Hungary, shops that sell cosmetics and toiletres sell only medicine that are not prescribed drugs.
    Yes, in America it is common that the place for prescribed medicine also sells what we call "over-the-counter" medicines (no prescription required) and many other things. The presence of a licensed professional pharmacist is the reason for the store. But they offer many other medicinal items. And, increasingly, cosmetics and food items, candy, small gifts, newspapers, etc.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,916

    Re: toiletries shop

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not a teacher.

    "Pharmacy" is the fancy American word, but "drug store" is common as well.

    In Britain, they call it a "chemist."
    Not just 'fancy American'; I'd say it was Global English. Many languages have a cognate for 'pharmacy', and maybe a better-hidden one for 'chemist' if any at all - e.g. Fr pharmacie (with chimie, phonetically more distant anyway, leading the student down the wrong semantic track anyway; in the 1950s I had a chemistry set with instructions that said I could buy extra chemicals from a chemist, but not many chemists do that any more - try going into Superdrug and asking for a gram of Potassium Permanganate!).

    Besides, because the USA owed so much to immigration, Am English tends to favour more widely accessible vocabulary. It may sound hi-falutin to a Br English ear, but it's not.

    b

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,324

    Re: toiletries shop

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    try going into Superdrug and asking for a gram of Potassium Permanganate!).


    b
    Ha ha!! Now you've made me want to try that! Potassium Permanaganate was my favourite chemical at school - just because it burnt purple, my favourite colour!

  10. #10
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,130

    Re: toiletries shop

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not a teacher.

    "Pharmacy" is the fancy American word, but "drug store" is common as well.
    It's not a "fancy" word, but rather a legal term. For example, in the US a drug store under construction (even chains like Rite Aid or Walgreen's) have to cover up the "pharmacy" part of their "Coming Soon!" outdoor signage until the store has been inspected by and approved by the state's Board of Pharmacy. A pharmacy indicates that there is a board-certified pharmacist on duty who is licensed to dispense prescription drugs.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •