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  1. #1
    sebayanpendam is offline Member
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    countable and uncountable nouns

    Hi,

    I have this dictionary which indicates (U/C) which means U for uncountable while C for countable. Of the words that marked with this symbol is 'assembly'. Does this mean we can use 'assembly' arbitrarily in writing and speaking or we have to decide which form of a noun should it take?

    e.g. We have (an) assembly today.

    p/s: Did i use the word 'arbitrarily' correctly?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: countable and uncountable nouns

    There's no easy answer to this, I'm afraid, Seb (can I call you Seb for short?)

    You used the word arbitrarily correctly, but the answer's no.

    'We have an assembly today; in fact, we have assemblies every day.'

    'The students filed quietly into assembly.'

    Rover

  3. #3
    sebayanpendam is offline Member
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    Re: countable and uncountable nouns

    Thanks.

    Yes, Seb is alright for me. I wish more explanation of words such as assembly given because I write reports in English. Anyway, thanks for your response.

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