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    #1

    The meaning of these sentences and the word 'rough'

    Hello!

    Could you please explain the meaning of these sentences to me?

    1.Is there a tumor in your humor.
    2.Are you getting on a bit.
    3.I got my back up.
    These phrases are from Robbie Williams` song "Supreme".
    I paid attention to the word 'rough ' in this song: "Do you need a bit of rough?"
    Does this noun have two forms, I mean "Rough" and "roughness"?
    What is the difference between them?
    And how would you rephrase the following sentence: 'She likes to switch teams'.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: The meaning of these sentences and the word 'rough'

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post
    Hello!

    Could you please explain the meaning of these sentences to me?
    ...
    Thank you.
    Hi!

    I'll try to explain it.
    So...

    Is there a tumor in your humor?

    It means smth. like " Have you no/bad sense of humor? "
    "tumor" is in rhyme to "humor", that's why author uses it.
    No special meaning.

    Are you getting on a bit?
    smth. like "Are you making progress?" Not "too much progress", but "a little", "a bit".

    I got my back up.
    get someone's back up = to make someone get angry.

    Do you need a bit of rough?
    It means smth. like "Do you want, that your life would always be without any troubles? Or do you need some (troubles)?"

    rough = roughness.
    But "rough" can be either a noun or a verb. "Roughness" can only be a noun.

    She likes to switch teams.
    She changes her opinion, friends, depending on what is better in this moment.
    Or maybe she is a football coach and likes to change teams.

    Hope it helps...

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    #3

    Re: The meaning of these sentences and the word 'rough'

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post
    Hello!

    Could you please explain the meaning of these sentences to me?

    1.Is there a tumor in your humor.
    As the previous poster said, this has been used because it rhymes. The only explanation might be that there is something wrong with the person's sense of humour, or with their mood.

    2.Are you getting on a bit?
    This is normally related to age. If you say someone is "getting on a bit", it means they are of a certain age, I would say probably over about 70, but I don't think there's a specific age it relates to.

    3.I got my back up.
    This doesn't really make any sense. You don't normally get your own back up. As the previous poster said, it means to annoy someone, but normally you would say (for example): "He got my back up", "I got her back up", meaning "He annoyed me" and "I annoyed her", respectively. You don't normally annoy yourself!

    These phrases are from Robbie Williams` song "Supreme".

    I paid attention to the word 'rough ' in this song: "Do you need a bit of rough?"
    Does this noun have two forms, I mean "Rough" and "roughness"?
    What is the difference between them?

    Rough - adjective. Roughness - noun. However (!), in this context, "rough" is used as a noun. It is a sort of abbreviation for "rough treatment". In a sexual context, "a bit of rough" means somewhat violent sex.

    And how would you rephrase the following sentence: 'She likes to switch teams'.
    The previous poster gave you a couple of ideas, but again there is also a potential sexual connotation here. Someone who "switches teams" might be bisexual, and would switch between having a male partner and a female partner. There are some "slang" phrases related to the same sort of thing. "Does he bat for the same side?" can mean "Is he homosexual?"

    Thank you.
    See above.

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    #4

    Re: The meaning of these sentences and the word 'rough'

    A bit of rough- this could also be used for someone from a higher class wanting to have sex with someone working class who lacks refinement.

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