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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #1

    To always

    Good afternoon (at least in my country ),
    I read the following sentence some days ago:
    We kindly ask you to always look after your children.

    I don't agree with its structure.
    In my opinion it should be:
    We kindly ask you always to look after your children.
    My explanation:
    Always is the opposite of never, and I learned not to use "to never", but "never to".
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...069-never.html

    Am I right?

    Cheers!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 438
    #2

    Re: To always

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Good afternoon (at least in my country ),
    I read the following sentence some days ago:
    We kindly ask you to always look after your children.

    I don't agree with its structure.
    In my opinion it should be:
    We kindly ask you always to look after your children.
    My explanation:
    Always is the opposite of never, and I learned not to use "to never", but "never to".
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...069-never.html

    Am I right?

    Cheers!

    Hi Nightmare,

    I have been culling some examples in which the adverb appears between TO and the rest of the infinitive: which is called a "split infinitive".
    I'd like to really understand Nietzche.
    He began to slowly get up off the floor.

    Although this structure is considered to be "bad style", it seems to be very common in English.

    Cheers

    Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.


    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 167
    #3

    Re: To always

    Well-put, ratoncolorao. The "rule" against splitting infinitives is still widely taught, but is routinely ignored by native speakers, including great writers. It was never really a rule of English; it was applied to the language by people trying to make it more like Latin. Average folks have seldom observed it.

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