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    #1

    to this point

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    And in their further disputes she always returned to this point.

    to this point = to the point = concerning or with relevance to the matter at hand

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Jun 2010
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    #2

    Re: to this point

    Good interpretation.

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    #3

    Re: to this point

    I understand nothing about your interpretation. All we need to know is the meaning of the word "point" , so look it up. To understand "this point" in this case, we need more specific context.
    Am I ignorant ?
    I'm sorry but I'm laughing and feeling the joy in your interpretation.
    Thank you so much !!!
    Last edited by crazYgeeK; 27-Jul-2010 at 10:09.

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    #4

    Re: to this point

    My dear young joker with the nutty name CrazygeeK,

    In my humble opinion you have to laugh less and to read more.

    Here is the wanted context:

    She took advantage, therefore, of the means of study the place offered her; and as she was already a musician and a good linguist, she speedily went through the little course of study which was considered necessary for ladies in those days. Her music she practiced incessantly, and one day, when the girls were out, and she had remained at home, she was overheard to play a piece so well that Minerva thought, wisely, she could spare herself the expense of a master for the juniors, and intimated to Miss Sharp that she was to instruct them in music for the future.
    The girl refused; and for the first time, and to the astonishment of the majestic mistress of the school.
    "I am here to speak French with the children," Rebecca said abruptly, "not to teach them music, and save money for you. Give me money, and I will teach them."
    Minerva was obliged to yield, and, of course, disliked her from that day.
    "For five-and-thirty years," she said, and with great justice, "I never have seen the individual who has dared in my own house to question my authority. I have nourished a viper in my bosom."
    "A viper--a fiddlestick," said Miss Sharp to the old lady, almost fainting with astonishment. "You took me because I was useful. There is no question of gratitude between us. I hate this place, and want to leave it. I will do nothing here but what I am obliged to do."
    It was in vain that the old lady asked her if she was aware she was speaking to Miss Pinkerton? Rebecca laughed in her face, with a horrid sarcastic demoniacal laughter, that almost sent the schoolmistress into fits.
    "Give me a sum of money," said the girl, "and get rid of me--or, if you like better, get me a good place as governess in a nobleman's family--you can do so if you please."
    And in their further disputes she always returned to this point.

    If you couldn't help laughing again reading my interpretation of the expression "to this point", it is high time you climbed down from the tree.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to this point

    You are right, Vil

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    This point (the trip to Italy that she didn't go on) then, was what she brought up, or returned to, whenever there was a dispute.
    I agree on it. In France, we French have a shaky slang idiom of the same kind: Women like bringing up scandals (hard points) on the table at the worst moments = Les femmes aiment remettre sur le tapis les mauvais dossiers au plus mauvais moments.

    Is there a better idiom in English?

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