Results 1 to 4 of 4

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1

    Proper use of in and on

    Hello, everyone.

    Any teacher who could teach me the usage of these prepositions : the on and the in. Thanks.


    Richard

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    73,340

    Re: Proper use of in and on

    That's a huge area. As a basic difference, use 'on' for a flat surface and 'in' for an enclosed one, or one with sides.

  3. #3
    Spiral is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    29

    Re: Proper use of in and on

    It depends on what you're referring to. Are you referring to in and on as prepositions of time or prepositions of location?

    If you are using them as prepositions of time, here is how I teach my adult students:

    Use in for longer periods of time: in the future, in the morning, in March, in the spring, in 1492

    Use on for days and dates: on April 15th, on Saturday, on the first day of Christmas, on the 30th

    Use at for clock time and very short times: at 8:00, at midnight, at present, at this moment, at quarter-past three, at the same time every day

    Hope that helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    31

    Re: Proper use of in and on

    I have some flash cards that might help with the meaning if you're talking about in or on in relation to place or movement. If you're a student the handout will be good enough.

    There are 8 prepositions of place listed and 14 prepositions of movement.
    www.mes-english.com/flashcards/prepositions.htm

    The prepositions of movement are maybe the most helpful. Preopositions of place are fairly easy to understand and use.

    I hope that helps.

    Mark
    www.mes-english.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •