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  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #1

    has much to be proud of

    Hello,
    A reputation comment says, "User has much to be proud of."
    Shouldn't it be, "User has a lot to be proud of."
    It's not a question nor a negative statement.

    Cheers!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: has much to be proud of

    In this case, it's okay the way it is.

    As you say, it's more common in the negative -- I haven't had much to each -- but "much to be proud of" is quite idiomatic. Your version is fine too!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: has much to be proud of

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    In this case, it's okay the way it is.

    As you say, it's more common in the negative -- I haven't had much to each -- but "much to be proud of" is quite idiomatic. Your version is fine too!
    It's the sort of idiomatic, archaic, rule-breaker that our late-lamented friend so dislikes! My father, rather than 'Thank you' used to say 'Much obliged' - or even 'I'm much obliged to you' - strangely reminiscent of the Portuguese Muito obrigado.

    The 'Only questions and negatives' "rule" is an over-simplification.

    b

  4. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: has much to be proud of

    Thanks, guys.

    I must say I wrote the "easy rule".
    Of course much can be used in positive sentences, like:
    I feel much lighter.
    My new car is much faster.
    I have much to do. -> Maybe correct?!
    I have much water. -> Not correct in my opinion!

    The sentence I wrote in my 1st post is not that sort, though.
    But you answered my question

    Cheers!


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    #5

    Re: has much to be proud of

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Thanks, guys.

    I must say I wrote the "easy rule".
    Of course much can be used in positive sentences, like:
    I feel much lighter.
    My new car is much faster.
    I have much to do. -> Maybe correct?!
    I have much water. -> Not correct in my opinion!

    The sentence I wrote in my 1st post is not that sort, though.
    But you answered my question

    Cheers!
    You've got a good handle on the use of "much," it seems. Your first two sentences are absolutely correct and perfectly natural. Your third sentence would work, though it sounds a bit whimsical and/or formal, if that makes sense; it would be completely unremarkable if you added "so" before "much." The fourth sentence, as you've surmised, is not correct.

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    #6

    Re: has much to be proud of

    How can we correct the fourth sentence ?

  5. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: has much to be proud of

    Quote Originally Posted by crazYgeeK View Post
    How can we correct the fourth sentence ?

    I have a lot of water.


    Cheers!

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: has much to be proud of

    'I have plenty of/lots of/gallons of water'. That "gallons" is hyperbolic - people often say 'gallons' when they just mean 'centilitres'. (Another hyperbolical word often used - in Br Eng - with liquid is 'awash': "More tea?" /"No thanks, I'm awash!"

    b

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: has much to be proud of

    Quote Originally Posted by Heterological View Post
    You've got a good handle on the use of "much," it seems. Your first two sentences are absolutely correct and perfectly natural. Your third sentence would work, though it sounds a bit whimsical and/or formal, if that makes sense; it would be completely unremarkable if you added "so" before "much." The fourth sentence, as you've surmised, is not correct.
    It's odd but true that "much" sometimes only sounds right with a modifier (intensifier?).

    I've got so much to do.
    He's got too much to do.
    I did way too much yesterday.
    There's far too much work to do.

    In the interrogative, it sounds OK on its own:

    Have you got much to do?
    Was there much to see?

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