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    #1

    What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    No I kid,

    Is the expression "I feel with you" the informal form of "I sympathize with you"?
    Because I couldn't find it on the site for idioms..

    antidisestablishmentarianism,
    Number

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    #2

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    Not a teacher.

    "I feel with you" is not an expression in American English.

    "I feel for you" is an expression of sympathy.

  1. Leandro-Z's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    It doesn`t exist or it is a word made up by someone.

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    #4

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    You'll see things like 'The way I feel with you', etc, meaning when I am with you.


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    #5

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    feel for you could be the informal of i sympathize with you.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leandro-Z View Post
    It doesn`t exist or it is a word made up by someone.
    It was a word coined for one particular area of discussion in the history of the Church of England. It is no longer used, and has few if any other uses: the C of E is an 'established church' - that is, its position in the country is formally recognized in an administrative way. The monarch is head of the C of E - the Queen 'chooses' the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is its chief cleric. (In fact, people advise her, but she signs the bit of paper). Bishops sit in the House of Lords (bishops of the C of E, that is).

    At some time (centuries ago) there was a movement against this. Members of this group were 'Disestablishmentarians'. People opposed to them... you can guess the rest. It was probably made up as a joke, but it was used at the time.

    Today though the word remains only as a curiosity - and it isn't even anywhere like 'the longest word in the language' - which it was touted as being, before bio-chemistry really got going!

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 28-Jul-2010 at 12:50. Reason: Added sentence


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    #7

    Re: What does "antidisestablishmentarianism" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It was a word coined for one particular area of discussion in the history of the Church of England. It is no longer used, and has few if any other uses: the C of E is an 'established church' - that is, its position in the country is formally recognized in an administrative way. The monarch is head of the C of E - the Queen 'chooses' the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is its chief cleric. (In fact, people advise her, but she signs the bit of paper). Bishops sit in the House of Lords (bishops of the C of E, that is).

    At some time (centuries ago) there was a movement against this. Members of this group were 'Disestablishmentarians'. People opposed to them... you can guess the rest. It was probably made up as a joke, but it was used at the time.

    Today though the word remains only as a curiosity - and it isn't even anywhere like 'the longest word in the language' - which it was touted as being, before bio-chemistry really got going!

    b
    he said he was kidding about the whole antidisestablishmentarianism.

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