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    #1

    Smile last night

    Hi, Morning everyone.

    1. The bridge has broken after last night's storm.

    2. The bridge has broken after the storm last night.

    To me, the first underlined is Ok and fine because 'last night' modifies storm. However the second underlined seems a bit ungrammatical because a noun (night) follows a noun (storm) directly.

    To me, 'after the storm last night' is an adjunct in this sentence, and 'last night' is a noun phrase in relation to the storm.

    Do you advise me to put "at" between them?
    The bridge has broken after the storm at last night.



    Thank you for your precious advice.

  1. 2010's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: last night

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    Hi, Morning everyone.

    1. The bridge has broken after last night's storm.

    2. The bridge has broken after the storm last night.

    To me, the first underlined is Ok and fine because 'last night' modifies storm. However the second underlined seems a bit ungrammatical because a noun (night) follows a noun (storm) directly.

    To me, 'after the storm last night' is an adjunct in this sentence, and 'last night' is a noun phrase in relation to the storm.

    Do you advise me to put "at" between them?
    The bridge has broken after the storm at last night.



    Thank you for your precious advice.

    ===Not a teacher===

    1. The bridge has broken (broken what?)

    2. He has broken the mirror.

    3. The bridge collapsed after the last night's storm.

    4. To me "has broken" does not sound correct. That is why, I have used the word "collapsed".

    4. Has broken = present perfect.

    Present perfect is not used to denote a time frame. It is an unknown time\duration.

    5. I have been to London. (It does not say when)

    6. You do not say: I have been to London yesterday.
    Last edited by 2010; 28-Jul-2010 at 08:35. Reason: correction

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    #3

    Re: last night

    After the storm last night is fine. They're both OK as sentences, but the second is more natural to me.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: last night

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    Hi, Morning everyone.

    1. The bridge has broken after last night's storm.

    2. The bridge has broken after the storm last night.

    To me, the first underlined is Ok and fine because 'last night' modifies storm. However the second underlined seems a bit ungrammatical because a noun (night) follows a noun (storm) directly.
    No it doesn't. There is another word between them - last.

    To me, 'after the storm last night' is an adjunct in this sentence, and 'last night' is a noun phrase in relation to the storm.

    Do you advise me to put "at" between them?
    The bridge has broken after the storm at last night.
    No, you can't do this. "last night" is an adverbial phrase like "yesterday", and doesn't require a preposition.

    Thank you for your precious advice.
    The only thing ungrammatical - about both sentences - is the use of the present perfect tense.

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    #5

    Smile Re: last night

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The only thing ungrammatical - about both sentences - is the use of the present perfect tense.
    Do you accept it if "since" replaces "after" in this sentence?

    The bridge has broken/collapsed since the storm last night.

    The sentence means that the collapse happened after a specific time in the past and it is still affecting us now.

    Is it acceptable to you?

    Thank you.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: last night

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    Do you accept it if "since" replaces "after" in this sentence?
    Yes
    The bridge has broken/collapsed since the storm last night.

    The sentence means that the collapse happened after a specific time in the past and it is still affecting us now.

    Is it acceptable to you?
    Yes.
    Thank you.
    The difference is that "after the storm" tends to refer to a specific time, so it requires the simple past.
    "Since the storm" is not specific.

    I've been into town since breakfast. Right.
    I've been into town after breakfast. Wrong
    I went into town after breakfast. Right.


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    #7

    Re: last night

    just change has broken to broke

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