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  1. wotcha's Avatar
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    #1

    the omit of verb

    The this-leafed varieties grow in rainy areas, and the thick-leafed varieties in areas more subject to drought.


    So... the verb 'grow' is omitted between varieties and in areas. I wonder why it is possible.

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    #2

    Re: the omit of verb

    Not a teacher.

    It's an "omission" of a verb, not an "omit." Omit is the verb, omission the noun.

    Did you have difficulty understanding the sentence without the word "grow" there twice?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the omit of verb

    Quote Originally Posted by wotcha View Post
    The this-leafed varieties grow in rainy areas, and the thick-leafed varieties in areas more subject to drought.


    So... the verb 'grow' is omitted between varieties and in areas. I wonder why it is possible.
    It's because "grow" has already been used in the first half of the sentence so it doesn't need to be repeated if you're simply giving another example of how something else does the same thing.

    I run fast, but my friend much faster.
    The blue paint spreads thickly, the green [paint] much less so.

  3. wotcha's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the omit of verb

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not a teacher.

    It's an "omission" of a verb, not an "omit." Omit is the verb, omission the noun.

    Did you have difficulty understanding the sentence without the word "grow" there twice?
    Thank you for your correction. Of course I don't have any difficulties understanding the sentence, but I need to explain it to my students why it is allowed in my grammar class. The students are always like.. ' Then teacher, why is it possible? Is there any grammar rule? Can you explain it grammatically?' haha.. Thx
    Last edited by wotcha; 29-Jul-2010 at 19:40.

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    #5

    Re: the omit of verb

    If it cannot be confused and is close enough to make sense, then we can omit.

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