Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 274
    #1

    Post Double digit

    Since "double" means two then how do I read or interpret the following sentence? Are they saying unemployment rate is 10(two numbers) or above. If not then does it mean 20. Please explain. Thanks . JKL

    This city has struggled with a double-digit unemployment rate since last year.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #2

    Re: Double digit

    Not a teacher.

    It means "Greater than 9, but less than 100." In other words, you need 2 digits to express it.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #3

    Re: Double digit

    It also leaves out "percent" which you are meant to interpolate.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,883
    #4

    Re: Double digit

    However, unemployment figures would either be expressed as a percentage or in hundreds, thousands or millions.

    If they're talking about percentages, then the unemployment rate has gone over 9% for the first time.

    If a country has an unemployment rate of 23,000,000 (23 million) then it might be described as "double-digit" unemployment.

    You would have to know what the unemployment figures are counted in.

    I would be very surprised if a city had an unemployment rate of between 10 and 99 people! That would be such a low figure that there would be no reason for the city to "struggle" with it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #5

    Re: Double digit

    "Rate" implies a ratio. It's generally understood that this is expressed as a percentage. But it's not uncommon in America to hear of "double-digit unemployment" without having to say it is a rate or percentage.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #6

    Re: Double digit

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Rate" implies a ratio. It's generally understood that this is expressed as a percentage. But it's not uncommon in America to hear of "double-digit unemployment" without having to say it is a rate or percentage.
    Hmm. A rate is expressed as a percentage in Aus - a 10% unemployment rate.
    If it implies a ratio, then the unemployment ratio is 10:90 - 10 unemployed to 90 employed; or perhaps 10/100 - ten in a hundred, 10 per hundred.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #7

    Re: Double digit

    Yes, it's common here to say "double-digit inflation" or "double-digit unemployment" etc to mean that it's at least 10%.

    The percent is understood.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,103
    #8

    Re: Double digit

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    The percent is understood.
    That's what I meant when I said the percentage was meant to be [mentally] interpolated. It's left out = it's understood.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #9

    Re: Double digit

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Hmm. A rate is expressed as a percentage in Aus - a 10% unemployment rate.
    If it implies a ratio, then the unemployment ratio is 10:90 - 10 unemployed to 90 employed; or perhaps 10/100 - ten in a hundred, 10 per hundred.
    Yeah, 10 out of 100 = 10%

    The point was that "rate" would never mean a raw number.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] double that?
    By goodsogi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Apr-2009, 14:56
  2. Using the digit zero
    By nicoleh101 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Mar-2008, 12:00
  3. Writing three or more digit numbers
    By D R Brubaker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2007, 00:35
  4. double
    By loveydovey in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2007, 13:16
  5. Words or Digit?
    By vladz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2004, 19:04

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •