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    #1

    captivity/ servitude

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the correctness of the following sentence?

    Through this decimating plague, God freed the children of Israel from their captivity and servitude in Egypt.

    captivity = bondage, slavery


    servitude = bondage, slavery


    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


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    #2

    Re: captivity/ servitude

    Hi Vil,
    Both slvery and servitude have the same meaning. Two words with the same meaning with 'and' can be used for emphasis. e.g.
    Tom is bold and brave.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: captivity/ servitude

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    There is a difference between these words. Captivity speaks more to being held against your will in a physical way. Servitude is more about having to work for someone - to serve.
    Agreed. And "bold" and "brave" don't mean the same thing, either.


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    #4

    Re: captivity/ servitude

    Oh well!
    Please clarify the difference between 'bold' and 'brave'

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    #5

    Re: captivity/ servitude

    brave = audacious, bold, courageous, daring, dauntless, fearless, hardy, heroic, indomitable, intrepid, plucky, resolute, stalwart, stout-hearten, unafraid, undaunted, valiant

    bold = fearless and daring; courageous

    brave = possessing or displaying courage; valiant

    For all that:


    Brave,
    the least specific, is frequently associated with an innate quality: "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver" (Herman Melville).

    Bold
    stresses readiness to meet danger or difficulty and often a tendency to seek it out: "If we shrink from the hard contests where men must win at the hazard of their lives ... then bolder and stronger peoples will pass us by" (Theodore Roosevelt).

    Regards,

    V.

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