Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. flatron's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 36
    #1

    ...to pencil someone in...

    Hi.I have just learned the phrasal verb "to pencil someone in"...my question is ...Is the opposite to pen someone in? Does it exist?Thanks!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,868
    #2

    Re: ...to pencil someone in...

    Quote Originally Posted by flatron View Post
    Hi.I have just learned the phrasal verb "to pencil someone in"...my question is ...Is the opposite to pen someone in? Does it exist?Thanks!
    I've never heard that, no.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: ...to pencil someone in...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I've never heard that, no.
    But I have heard 'to ink someone in', but rarely, and always in context where the person has been pencilled in first.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 283
    #4

    Re: ...to pencil someone in...

    Not a teacher only a native speaker.

    I wouldn't have thought so, as a pen is more permanent, so if anything would only be confirming the appointment even more than 'penciling' someone in would be.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #5

    Re: ...to pencil someone in...

    You could use it in a joking way.

    For example, the person says "Should I pencil you in?" and you could say "No, I'm going to be there for sure! You can pen me in!" But it's not a standard idiom; you would just be playing with words.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #6

    Re: ...to pencil someone in...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    But I have heard 'to ink someone in', but rarely, and always in context where the person has been pencilled in first.

    b
    The expression 'to ink in' can be used in this sort of context:

    "OK, you'll be here tomorrow at 12.00. That's definite is it? You're not going to change your mind again. Can I ink it in?' (It's pretty informal, but I've heard it used - in the UK that is.)

    b

Similar Threads

  1. pencil case
    By sash2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Oct-2009, 10:30
  2. A pencil is on the desk.
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2008, 13:42
  3. Colour pencil or coloured pencil
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2008, 20:57
  4. pencil out
    By unpakwon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Jul-2007, 20:09
  5. Put that red pencil away!
    By blacknomi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Nov-2004, 20:44

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •