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    #1

    Correct my sentences.

    Correct my sentences.

    Although similar in looks, they are worlds apart from within/inside.

    Her excuses seemed implausible.

    Are you making a fool out of me?

    He poured himself some water from/through/via/out of the pitcher.

    Once the new product hits the market, our rival comapany will salsh their prices.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: Correct my sentences.

    Although looking similar, they are different worlds inside their souls.

    Her excuses seemed to be implausible.

    Are you making a fool out of me?

    He poured himself some water out of the pitcher.

    Once the new product hits the market, the rival of our company will come down.

    Thanks!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Correct my sentences.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Mckane View Post
    Correct my sentences.

    Although similar in looks, they are worlds apart from within/inside.
    This is fine. You might make a play on opposite worlds with Although similar on the outside, they are worlds about on the inside. While CG's rewrite is poetic, it would not apply, for example, to the difference between a peach and an apricot.

    Her excuses seemed implausible.
    Fine

    Are you making a fool out of me?
    I'd suggest "trying to make" -- in the end, only you can make a food of yourself. You can also say "of me" as well as "out of me."

    He poured himself some water from/through/via/out of the pitcher.
    I'd say from.

    Once the new product hits the market, our rival comapany will salsh slash their prices.
    Competitors sounds more natural to me than rival company. I assume salsh was just a typo.
    Thanks.
    Let me know if you have any follow-up questions.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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