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    #1

    a few connotations of "walk out"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Well, it all started when my wife walked out on me.

    You can't walk out on your family at a time like this.

    You can't walk out on the contract, or you could be taken to court.

    walk out on = to leave in the lurch ; abandon, desert

    I think I'll walk out for a little while, to get a breath of fresh air.


    walk out = leave the room, go out


    The electricians have walked out, and will stay out until their demands are met.


    walk out = go on strike


    The footman and the cook have been walking out for several months now.

    walk out = have love-making


    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: a few connotations of "walk out"

    I would agree with all but the last. I've never heard that idiom, but more commonly "stepping out" - and to me it doesn't mean making love, but rather simply dating.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a few connotations of "walk out"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Well, it all started when my wife walked out on me.

    You can't walk out on your family at a time like this.

    You can't walk out on the contract, or you could be taken to court.

    walk out on = to leave in the lurch ; abandon, desert - All OK.

    I think I'll walk out for a little while, to get a breath of fresh air.


    walk out = leave the room, go out
    - It's not wrong, but it also doesn't sound very natural. I would say "I think I'll take/go for a short walk, to get some fresh air.

    The electricians have walked out, and will stay out until their demands are met.


    walk out = go on strike
    Yes

    The footman and the cook have been walking out for several months now.

    walk out = have love-making
    This is a slightly archaic phrase, and I would say it doesn't actually involve making love (having sex). It simply suggests that the two have been dating and are involved in some kind of potentially romantic relationship.

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    See above.

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