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    #1

    it was bit of a hike.

    Hello.

    I'm confused with "bit of" and "a bit of".

    I think "a bit of" means a little, like in the sentence "I ate a bit of cake."

    But, when I say "It was bit of a hike", it means the hike was tough and I'm more tired than just "a little tired", right?

    Are there any differences between "bit of" or "a bit of"???

    And here's my second question. "A little bit" and "A little" are the same?
    For example, I'm a little bit tired. I'm a little tired.


    Please answer my 2 questions above.
    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: it was bit of a hike.

    Quote Originally Posted by karina1 View Post
    Hello.

    I'm confused with "bit of" and "a bit of".

    I think "a bit of" means a little, like in the sentence "I ate a bit of cake."

    But, when I say "It was bit of a hike", it means the hike was tough and I'm more tired than just "a little tired", right?

    No - it should be "It was a bit of a hike". It also doesn't mean anything relating to how tired you are. It simply means "It was quite a long walk".

    Are there any differences between "bit of" or "a bit of"???



    And here's my second question. "A little bit" and "A little" are the same?
    For example, I'm a little bit tired. I'm a little tired.

    In this context, they mean the same thing, but using both "little" and "bit" isn't really necessary. "I'm a little tired" or "I'm a bit tired" would both suffice.


    Please answer my 2 questions above.
    Thank you!
    See above.

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    #3

    Re: it was bit of a hike.

    Are there any differences between "bit of" or "a bit of"?
    It depends on the context.

    'Have a bit of cake.'

    'Have an extra bit of cake.'

    'Read out the next bit of the story.'

    Rover

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    #4

    Unhappy Re: it was bit of a hike.

    Hi emsr2d2/ All,

    Really confused! Since I always thought "a bit" means "To a small degree".
    So when I offer somebody my favourite food I usually ask them to have a bit of it. But now I understand why they were having a lot instead of less/little.

    No - it should be "It was a bit of a hike". It also doesn't mean anything relating to how tired you are. It simply means "It was quite a long walk".

    But dictionary too says "a bit" means "To a small degree" then how could "a bit of a hike" became a long walk instead of a short walk?

    Please kindly clear my doubt.
    Waiting anxiously for an answer......

    Regards, Ihope.

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    #5

    Re: it was bit of a hike.

    Quote Originally Posted by ihop View Post
    Hi emsr2d2/ All,

    Really confused! Since I always thought "a bit" means "To a small degree".
    So when I offer somebody my favourite food I usually ask them to have a bit of it. But now I understand why they were having a lot instead of less/little.

    No - it should be "It was a bit of a hike". It also doesn't mean anything relating to how tired you are. It simply means "It was quite a long walk".

    But dictionary too says "a bit" means "To a small degree" then how could "a bit of a hike" became a long walk instead of a short walk?

    Please kindly clear my doubt.
    Waiting anxiously for an answer......

    Regards, Ihope.
    Thank you for that! This is the first time I've ever actually considered the rather unusual use of "a bit of" in this context!!!!

    You're absolutely right that it means "a small amount" and if you offer your eating companions "a bit" of your food, they should only take a forkful or so.

    I readily admit that I have absolutely no idea why "a bit of a hike" means "Actually, it was quite a long way"!! Though now I think about it, we use the same phrase quite a lot:

    Was your exam easy?
    Actually, no, it was a bit of a nightmare!

    Do you like the new guy at work?
    No, he's a bit of an idiot actually.

    What's your new job like?
    It's OK, but my first day was a bit of a trial!

    In all those cases, I would say that what was really meant was "it was an absolute nightmare/he's an idiot/it was very difficult". Perhaps we're using it in a sarcastic/ironic way but honestly, I don't know.

    If anyone else can come up with a good explanation for it, I'll be very interested to hear it!

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    #6

    Question Re: it was bit of a hike.

    ****** Not a teacher, just a learner*********

    Do you like the new guy at work?
    No, he's a bit of an idiot actually -

    I personally feel that he is idiot in small quantity. Because if he would be idiot in large scale then not have got selected for work.

    I think in all the below examples it meant in a small quantity.

    Was your exam easy?
    Actually, no, it was a bit of a nightmare!
    I personally feel this means:
    Exam wasn't easy, but tough not tougher.

    Presumably, It was a bit of a hike - means not very short, but not longer either.

    Hope this makes sense.

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    #7

    Re: it was bit of a hike.

    Quote Originally Posted by ihop View Post
    ****** Not a teacher, just a learner*********

    Do you like the new guy at work?
    No, he's a bit of an idiot actually -

    I personally feel that he is idiot in small quantity. Because if he would be idiot in large scale then not have got selected for work.

    Do you really think that idiots don't get picked for jobs?!! If that's the case where you are, then I'm very jealous! Perhaps I should have used "a bit boring" instead!

    I think in all the below examples it meant in a small quantity.

    Was your exam easy?
    Actually, no, it was a bit of a nightmare!
    I personally feel this means:
    Exam wasn't easy, but tough not tougher.

    Well, the problem here is that it's rather a contradiction in terms. A nightmare is, by definition, pretty bad. It's actually quite difficult for something only to be "a bit of a nightmare". It's either a nightmare or it's not.

    Presumably, It was a bit of a hike - means not very short, but not longer either.

    With "a bit of a hike" I tend to think we use it when the walk has just been longer than expected.

    Hope this makes sense.
    As I said, I'm finding it hard to explain why we use this the way we do, given its definition!! See above.

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