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    #1

    drop the pilot

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    In face of these scourges Charles decided to “drop the pilot”.

    drop the pilot = give up a confidential adviser

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V
    Last edited by vil; 08-Aug-2010 at 06:46.

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    #2

    Re: drop the pilot

    No idea.

    It can't be 'sings'.

    You usually give us more context than this.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: drop the pilot

    But probably could be "sights" or "scourges"

    These sentence is from Trevelyan's "History of England" book IV, chapter VI

    V.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: drop the pilot

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    In face of these scourges Charles decided to “drop the pilot”.

    drop the pilot = give up a confidential adviser

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V
    Yes - but not necessarily confidential. This expression refers to a cartoon in Punch, published when the Kaiser dismissed Bismarck: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Ruecktritt.jpg

    b

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: drop the pilot

    Another interpretation could be a TV producer who decides against a proposed new show based on its sample, or pilot.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: drop the pilot

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Another interpretation could be a TV producer who decides against a proposed new show based on its sample, or pilot.
    That's possible* with no reference to the context. But an English historian writing about history can't have been referring to anything but dispensing with the advice of a statesman.

    * Hang on though. They might drop the planned series after the pilot. The only case for this sort of 'drop the pilot' would be if a TV company was planning to broadcast a pilot and then dropped it.

    b

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