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    #1

    What is the difference ?

    Can somebody tell me what is the difference between "level off" and "remained constant" in terms of describing graphs. From my understanding, both words have the same meaning but somehow I have a feeling that I might be wrong. I'm taking IELTS this week and those 2 words are making me confused. Thanks.

    Regards

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by harrylynn View Post
    Can somebody tell me what is the difference between "level off" and "remained constant" in terms of describing graphs. From my understanding, both words have the same meaning but somehow I have a feeling that I might be wrong. I'm taking IELTS this week and those 2 words are making me confused. Thanks.

    Regards
    If a graph is rising or falling and then becomes level, it has "levelled off". Levelling off is a process of change.
    If a graph remains constant, it doesn't change.


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    #3

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    If a graph is rising or falling and then becomes level, it has "levelled off". Levelling off is a process of change.
    If a graph remains constant, it doesn't change.
    So, levelled off focus more on the process of change and remain constant focus more on the stability of the line ?


    In the above picture, can I say after 40 radial distance, it becomes levelled off and remained constant till 100 radian distance ?

    Thanks you for helping me out. I do really appreciate it

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    #4

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by harrylynn View Post
    So, levelled off focus more on the process of change and remain constant focus more on the stability of the line ?


    In the above picture, can I say after 40 radial distance, it becomes levelled off and remained constant till 100 radian distance ?

    Thanks you for helping me out. I do really appreciate it
    Yes, it levels off between 40 and 60, and then remains constant.


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    #5

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Thank you very much.

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    #6

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, it levels off between 40 and 60, and then remains constant.
    Hi Ray,
    Can we say it levels off between 40 and 100?

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    #7

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by hanky View Post
    Hi Ray,
    Can we say it levels off between 40 and 100?
    No, don't say that. It's constant between 60 and 100.

    If you say it leveled off between 40 and 100, it sounds like to didn't reach that constant value until it got to 100. It sounds like from 40-100 it will still not level.

    And welcome to Using English, harrylynn.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 11-Aug-2010 at 15:56.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by hanky View Post
    Hi Ray,
    Can we say it levels off between 40 and 100?
    Levelling off is the process of becoming level. If it has already reached a constant value at 60, it is no longer levelling off between 60 and 100.
    It is level between 60 and 100, but it is not levelling off; it has already levelled off between 40 and 60.

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    #9

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Levelling off is the process of becoming level. If it has already reached a constant value at 60, it is no longer levelling off between 60 and 100.
    It is level between 60 and 100, but it is not levelling off; it has already levelled off between 40 and 60.
    If I just say the rotational velocity decreases when the radial distance increases from 40 to 60 and it's constant when the radial distance is between 60 and 100, does it sound worse than saying the rotational velocity levels off between 40 and 60, and it's constant when the radial distance is between 60 and 100?

    Thanks.

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    #10

    Re: What is the difference ?

    Your version is actually more specific. When you say it levels off, you don't know if it becomes constant after increasing, or becomes constant after decreasing.

    Your version says that it was higher, then it gets lower to attain that constant. It's more informative, therefore more precise. (And this is a good distinction between accurate and precise. You are no more accurate, but you are more precise.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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