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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #1

    walk a tightrope/ be on a tightrope

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Often it was necessary for the Government to walk a tightrope to avoid alienating one side or the other.

    walk a tightrope = be on a tightrope = take or be on a very precarious course; figurative mean. be in stays; pol. trim

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 12-Aug-2010 at 10:02.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • England
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      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,479
    #2

    Re: walk a tightrope/ be on a tightrope

    '...take a very precarious course' in this context.

    Rover

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