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    #1

    Cool Present Perfect

    Hello!

    Is the use of the PP correct in these cases:

    -I had to make and choice and that's it, I've made it! (before announcing it)


    -We've had many problems, again!

    -What kind of nice party have you prepared for her? (this is at the very very beginning of the party).

    -I've had many problems that's why I didn't check my emails. (Is the sequence of tenses correct, here?).

    -I've had many problems that's why I haven't had time to check my emails (could we say "didn't have time"?).

    -I've created my own company!

    -oh, you've changed the colour of your living-room!! (could we also use the Past Simple in this case?)

    -That's it, I've signed the contract! (putting the pen down).

    -I've booked two rooms. (before going to that hotel). Could we also use the Past Simple in this case?



    Thanks a lot
    W

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello!

    Is the use of the PP correct in these cases:

    -I had to make a choice and that's it, I've made it! (before announcing it) OK


    -We've had many problems, again! OK

    -What kind of nice party have you prepared for her? (this is at the very very beginning of the party).OK, the "nice" is not very natural though.[/COLOR]

    -I've had many problems that's why I didn't check my emails. (Is the sequence of tenses correct, here?). It's fine.

    -I've had many problems that's why I haven't had time to check my emails (could we say "didn't have time"?). You could but it would have a different meaning.

    -I've created my own company! [OK

    -oh, you've changed the colour of your living-room!! (could we also use the Past Simple in this case?) Yes, you could.

    -That's it, I've signed the contract! (putting the pen down).OK

    -I've booked two rooms. (before going to that hotel). Could we also use the Past Simple in this case? Yes, you could.



    Thanks a lot
    W
    .

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Present Perfect

    -I've had many problems that's why I haven't had time to check my emails (could we say "didn't have time"?).
    You could but it would have a different meaning.

    I agree, except for in those pockets of North America where the simple past often does for the present perfect.

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    #4

    Re: Present Perfect

    -I've had many problems; that's why I haven't had time to check my emails (could we say "didn't have time"?). You could but it would have a different meaning.

    What would the difference be in the other "pockets"?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Present Perfect

    To me, if you say you didn't have time, the opportunity for doing it is past.

    If you say that you haven't had time, you can still do it.

    I find the mixture of the PP and simple past jarring.

    I had some problems (then) so I couldn't (then)
    I've had some problems, so I haven't been able to (yet).
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    To me, if you say you didn't have time, the opportunity for doing it is past.

    If you say that you haven't had time, you can still do it.

    I find the mixture of the PP and simple past jarring. But however one feels about the mixture of tenses, the question is whether there is a difference in meaning between "haven't had" and "didn't have" in the sentence in question.

    I had some problems (then) so I couldn't (then)
    I've had some problems, so I haven't been able to (yet).
    But the first part of the original sentence says "I've" had, not 'I had'. So to me that says that the day, or whatever time period, isn't over yet. The sentence is saying that up to the time just now ended, I (haven't had)(didn't have) time to check my emails. I still could have time to check them later.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    -I've had many problems; that's why I haven't had time to check my emails (could we say "didn't have time"?). You could but it would have a different meaning.

    What would the difference be in the other "pockets"?
    Do you mean in standard non-pocket English?
    "I haven't had time" means up until now and continuing; I might still find the time. That is, it implies "I haven't had time yet."
    "I didn't have time" means in the past; it could possibly extend up to now, but it implies nothing about a future possibility.

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    #8

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "I haven't had time" means up until now and continuing; I might still find the time. That is, it implies "I haven't had time yet."
    "I didn't have time" means in the past; it could possibly extend up to now, but it implies nothing about a future possibility. So are you disagreeing with Barb's statement that "didn't" means that the opportunity for checking the emails has passed?
    And the question still is what the difference in meaning between the two tenses in the sentence in question is.
    2006

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    Originally Posted by Raymott
    "I haven't had time" means up until now and continuing; I might still find the time. That is, it implies "I haven't had time yet."
    "I didn't have time" means in the past; it could possibly extend up to now, but it implies nothing about a future possibility. So are you disagreeing with Barb's statement that "didn't" means that the opportunity for checking the emails has passed?
    I don't think that "didn't" means that semantically. In ordinary usage it would tend to imply that, but the implication is linguistic, not logical.

    And the question still is what the difference in meaning between the two tenses in the sentence in question is.
    This was my answer to that question. What is lacking?
    R.

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    #10

    Re: Present Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    R.
    I'll take your answer to mean that there is no 'real difference' in meaning between the two tenses in the sentence in question.

    Another thing, after I responded to Barb I noticed the sentence in the OP immediately before the one we just talked about, the one bhai said "It's fine."
    Do you agree that it's fine? I do, except for some lack of punctuation.
    I am not trying to start an argument between you two.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by 2006; 13-Aug-2010 at 01:08. Reason: spelling

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