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  1. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #1

    In/For

    Hey, folks!

    I've just watched PS I love you and heard this:

    "I haven't done it in a while".

    I'm rather used to for instead of in. I consider both correct, though they do not mean exactly the same to me. For would be for the duration while in is more for the time separating the two times she did it (ie kissed).

    Thanks in advance.

  2. Nightmare85's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: In/For

    **Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.**

    Hello,
    I'm not fully sure about "in a while", but I know it can be used this way:
    I haven't seen him for 2 weeks.
    I haven't seen him in 2 weeks.


    As far as I know both sentences have the same meaning.
    So I guess it's the same case for your sentence.

    P.S. A confirmation by some teachers or other members would be nice

    Cheers!

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    #3

    Re: In/For

    Quote Originally Posted by philadelphia View Post
    Hey, folks!

    I've just watched PS I love you and heard this:

    "I haven't done it in a while".

    I'm rather used to for instead of in. I consider both correct, though they do not mean exactly the same to me. For would be for the duration while in is more for the time separating the two times she did it (ie kissed).

    Thanks in advance.
    - Not A Teacher -

    The sentence is OK and as Nightmare said you can use both in and for.

    I haven't done it in a while
    I haven't done it for a while

    While is a conjunction and means "during the time that, or at the same time as". In mainly UK formal is said "whilst".

  3. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: In/For

    I know they mean the same but I do not think they mean exactly the same thing. My try would seem okay. Thanks all the same.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: In/For

    Quote Originally Posted by philadelphia View Post
    I know they mean the same but I do not think they mean exactly the same thing. Thanks all the same.
    I agree.

    When I first met this usage (on my older brothers imported American 78s in the 1950s) I hated it. It seemed to me a gratuitous source of confusion:
    • 'I'll see you in a while' - the words 'in a while' point to the future
    • 'I haven't seen you in a while' - the words 'in a while' point to the past


    But this is silly. There's no real confusion (except the the sort seen by a stuffy Brit ). The verb tells you where the 'in a while' is; 'in a while' is just a period.

    L'Envoi [literary French for 'the send-off'']

    They both exist. Some users of Br Eng prefer to use only 'for a while' and regard 'in a while' as "a mistake". I disagree, and many other speakers of Br Eng do. I think it's useful and distinctive; I don't think it's "exactly the same".

    b

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