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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 23
    #1

    can someone correct if one's sees any mistakes? thank u so much

    It is very interesting to see how Smith chose to tackle this difficult topic in contrast with Kureishi's approach. When one wants to bring about a debate as important and controversial as racism one should be very careful. Many remarkable post-colonial writers often present racism and multiculturalism in a balanced manner often using humour and satire allowing them, subsequently, to defuse the seriousness of situation. This is an striking feature of Smith’s style of writing. Most situations, (be it in White Teeth, On Beauty or The Autograph Man) in which characters are confronted with racism are appalling and weirdly, very funny at the same time.

    Kureishi wrote The Buddha of Suburbia in 1990, a time when racial violence was considerably higher than it is now. Furthermore, his novel reflects 1970s England, a time when racism in England was very severe, marked by the rise of Enoch Powel and hostile riots that occurred all over the country. Asians immigrants, especially, had faced negative and hostile reactions when coming to Britain. Thus, Kureishi’s novel is notable for its examination of racism and alienation experienced by immigrants in 1970s Britain. Kureishi’s depiction of racism is therefore much darker and more serious than Smith’s. For example, Jamila, the best friend of the narrator Karim, is very involved in politics and more particularly in the anti-racist-movement because she does not want to live a life full of ‘‘fear of violence’’. She wants to change things. She joins demonstrations, gets inspired by the American Black movement, reading Malcom X and James Baldwin. It is through Jamila’s actions that the reader is given a view of London’s political climate in the 1970s. The brutality of racism she faces with her family is depicted in the scene in which neo-fascists carve with a razor blade, the initials of the National Front into her husband’ stomach .

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 23
    #2

    Re: can someone correct if one's sees any mistakes? thank u so much

    thank u so much!

    I dont really know how to use comas and I think I never really did know!

    Is there any rules, things that I can remember in order to use coma properly?

    After which words for example it is like kind of compulsory to use it?

    Thanks again,


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