Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #1

    tell

    Hello guys,
    I'm not sure how to use tell anymore.

    Usually I add a person after a tell.
    Should I tell her this?
    Can you tell him that I'm at home, please?

    However, there are some things that confuse me a bit.
    I will tell this an admin.
    I will tell this someone.
    I will tell this Tom.
    In these examples it sounds strange to me to use the same construction as for the first examples.

    Can you help me out?

    Cheers!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #2

    Re: tell

    Insert a "to" before the people in your second set, and you're fine.

    Just like I will give the ball to Jim and I will give Jim the ball, but not I will give the ball Jim.

    I will tell a story to Jim. I will tell Jim a story. Not I will tell a story Jim.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #3

    Exclamation Re: tell

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    Hello guys,
    I'm not sure how to use tell anymore.

    Usually I add a person after a tell.
    Should I tell her this/the truth? (this/the truth are direct objects, because the indirect object 'her' is an objective pronoun)
    Can you tell him that I'm at home, please? (underlined directive clause is direcct object as 'him' is an objective pronoun)

    However, there are some things that confuse me a bit.
    I will tell this to an admin.
    I will tell this to someone.
    I will tell this to Tom.
    In these examples it sounds strange to me to use the same construction as for the first examples.

    Can you help me out?

    Cheers!
    The verb ‘tell’ is a transitive verb that requires both a direct object and one or more objects which is usually an indirect object, but it can also be a declarative clause or an infinitive/infinitival clause.
    I told her to go home. (object + infinitive)
    In your 1st set of examples there is a directive clause as object using ‘that’.
    In your 2nd set of examples "this' is demonstrative pronoun which acts as direct object, so you have to use the preposition ‘to’ in order to link the object in bold with the sentence but in that case the prepositional phrase acts as object complement and not an indirect object.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 16-Aug-2010 at 05:10.

  3. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #4

    Re: tell

    Thank you, guys

    So you're saying that it would be correct to say:
    I will tell an admin this.
    I will tell someone this.
    I will tell Tom this.

    Maybe it sounds a bit strange because this is just one word, I don't know

    Cheers!

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #5

    Re: tell

    I would sound a bit more natural to say "I will tell this to Tom," but I don't find anything ungrammatical about it. You're right though - it seems like you want to keep talking "this unexpected bit of new," "this information about the new meeting date," etc.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. philadelphia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 838
    #6

    Re: tell

    Tell would tend to work as give does. Eg I gave him something; Give it to me.

  6. Nightmare85's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,333
    #7

    Re: tell

    But this would mean tell and say are the same!?

    Say something to someone.
    Tell something to someone.

    I'm sure I read there is a difference...

    Cheers!

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #8

    Re: tell

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    But this would mean tell and say are the same!?

    Say something to someone.
    Tell something to someone.

    I'm sure I read there is a difference...

    Cheers!
    There is a difference, for example: "tell me" not "say me".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Somali
      • Home Country:
      • Somalia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 2,993
    #9

    Re: tell

    I checked my Grammar and got this result,

    These verbs followed by indirect objects introduced by togive, hand, lend, pass, send, show, tell, and write”.

    a) I will tell this to Alex.
    b) I will tell Alex this.

    Some verbs are followed by two objects: a direct object and an indirect object.

    (a) and (b) have the same meaning.

    The preposition to is not used when the indirect object is first and the direct object is second.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •