Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    be off my peck

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to help to me to interpret the phrase in bold in the following sentences?
    Frank, are you hungry?

    Not, the least in the world. Completely off my peck in fact.

    Be off my peck = have no appetite, be off one’s oats

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,462
    #2

    Re: be off my peck

    I've never heard this one, Vil. Where did you find it?

    I'm guessing it's not Thackeray this time.

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: be off my peck

    Hi Rover KE,

    You made a right guess. The key phrase is from Shaw’s “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” . To the best of my knowledge, B.Shaw has a good reputation and is person with world renown. I know it as a fact at least in my area.

    I hope, you wouldn’t get angry with me for my intrusive showing an inclination for strange English phrases?

    Regards,

    V.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: be off my peck

    This could be related to the word 'peckish' (which is currently used, to mean 'a bit hungry': 'I'm stuffed' ... 'I'm peckish' ... 'I could eat a horse' are on a continuum of hungriness from 'not at all' to 'very'!)

    Either 'peck' used to be in common use, and 'peckish' shows it as a fossil, or Shaw's character was playfully neologizing (combining the expression 'off my food' - a common idiom meaning 'having lost my appetite' - with the word 'peckish').

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,462
    #5

    Re: be off my peck

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi Rover KE,



    I hope, you wouldn’t get angry with me for my intrusive showing an inclination for strange English phrases?

    Regards,

    V.

    Angry, Vil? Never!

    I admire your thirst for knowledge, and a few of your posts have taught me expressions I had never heard before.

    It would often be useful, though, if you were to give the source and/or author of your quotations.

    Bob has given an excellent answer to this question, in my opinion. It sounds very Wodehousian - like something Bertie Wooster would say.

    Rover

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #6

    Re: be off my peck

    I think the interpretation is correct. With Shaw, Shakespeare, Faulkner and a handful of others, we don't ask if it exists, we just admire its expressiveness.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: be off my peck

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    ...

    It sounds very Wodehousian - like something Bertie Wooster would say.

    Rover
    I thought of Wodehouse too ('plummy' rather than Shavian!)

    b

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #8

    Re: be off my peck

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I thought of Wodehouse too ('plummy' rather than Shavian!)

    b
    Excuse me, I understand the Wodehouse comment, but not the parenthetical remark. Could you explain that part to me, please?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #9

    Re: be off my peck

    A try at random.

    Wilfred Hyde-White is plummy, apple-cheeked and confiding.
    Shvian = characteristic for Shaw’s style


    V.
    Last edited by vil; 18-Aug-2010 at 20:15.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #10

    Re: be off my peck

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Wilfred Hyde-White is plummy, apple-cheeked and confiding.
    Shvian = characteristic for Show’s style


    V.
    I don't understand what you mean by plummy or apple-cheeked, and who is Show?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Kelly Peck
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2008, 05:19
  2. peck away at the edges?
    By Eway in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2006, 07:30

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •