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    #1

    Old chestnuts

    In the "The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch, I have found some cliches given (PP.147-148) beyond my comprehension. Dear teachers, I would be much grateful if you could give me some hints about them:
    • Dance with the one who brung you.
    • Whether you think you can or can't, you're right.
    • Other than that, Mrs Lincoln, how was the play?
    • To win one for the Gipper.
    • To go out and execute.
    • To keep the drive alive.
    • To march down the field.
    • To avoid costly turnovers.
    • To win games in the trenches even if they were gonna feel it on Monday.
    Thanks a lot.

  1. Tullia's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 628
    #2

    Re: Old chestnuts

    Wow there are lots here. I won't explain them all for you too much, but I'll see if I can give you some hints to help you figure them out, or give you some useful links!


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    Dance with the one who brung you.
    This is about politeness and courtesy. "Brung" is an old-fashioned form of the word "brought" - does that help?


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    Whether you think you can or can't, you're right.
    This is about the power of your mind to influence your life.
    "Whether you think you can or can't [do something], you're right."
    Can you figure it out now?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    Other than that, Mrs Lincoln, how was the play?
    I haven't heard this before, but I think it must refer to the death of Abraham Lincoln and be a bit of a bad joke about making the best of a bad situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    To win one for the Gipper.
    Maybe this link will help:
    George Gipp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    To go out and execute.
    I haven't heard this as a cliche before; what is the context?
    Does the literal meaning not make sense?


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    To keep the drive alive.
    This just means what it says: to keep the drive [passion, energy] alive [strong, vibrant]. It's become a cliche because it is a catchy rhyme of drive/alive.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    To march down the field.
    To avoid costly turnovers.
    Again, these aren't cliches I am familiar with - though perhaps they are more common in American English than Br English. Can you give us some context to help us work them out?


    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    To win games in the trenches even if they were gonna feel it on Monday.
    This is applying a metaphor of war to a sport. "In the trenches" is a military term you should be able to look up. Does that help you understand it?


    If you are still struggling with the ones I have given you hints for, just ask and I'll try and explain them more fully - but it's a better learning technique to try to figure them out from hints first I think!

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