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  1. vectra's Avatar
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    #1

    How to put it right?

    Hello!
    Is it OK to say the following:
    - taught English to schoolchildren from Grade 4 throughout Grade 11
    - was appointed homeroom teacher of Grade 11 (school-leavers)
    By homeroom teacher I mean a teacher who is responsible for a specific grade or form. He/she supervises dayly activities only of this assigned class. If there is a problem, let's say with Math, this particular teacher tries to get in touch with the parents of schoolchildren who are lagging behind as well as Math teacher to solve this issue. He or she usually teaches a school subject, but his primary area of concern this particular grade. They are just like parents for the schoolchildren from this grade. also these teachers organize all out-of-school activities for their grade, and must be present there as they are responsible for the safety of this grade. My feeling is that form teacher is OK in British English, and homeroom teacher is from American English.

    Thank you in advance

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    #2

    Re: How to put it right?

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    Hello!
    Is it OK to say the following:
    - taught English to schoolchildren from Grade 4 throughout Grade 11

    - was appointed homeroom teacher of Grade 11 (school-leavers) not sure what you mean by "school-leavers"

    By homeroom teacher I mean a teacher who is responsible for a specific grade or form. I think 'class' would be better. But if you have only one class in each grade, either would be okay.
    He/she supervises daily activities only of this assigned class. If there is a problem, let's say with Math, this particular teacher tries to get in touch with the parents of schoolchildren who are lagging behind, as well as with a Math teacher, to solve ('address' would be better) this issue. He or she usually teaches a school subject, but his primary area of concern is this particular class.

    They are just like parents for the schoolchildren from in this class. Also, these teachers organize all out-of-school activities for their class, and must be present there as they are responsible for the safety of this class. My feeling is that form teacher is OK in British English, and homeroom teacher is from American English.
    I wasn't trying to divide your article into paragraphs; I was just trying to space it out for the sake of my corrections.
    Thank you in advance
    2006

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    #3

    Re: How to put it right?

    My feeling is that form teacher is OK in British English, and homeroom teacher is from American English.
    You're right about that, Vectra.

    Rover

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