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    • Join Date: Aug 2010
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    #1

    , and

    I would like to ask if is it mandatory or a general rule to always put a comma before the word 'and?'

    Example:
    I was becoming very tired, and it was hard to keep my emotions in check.

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: , and

    Not a teacher.

    No, it is not always required. And it is not necessary in your example.

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    #3

    Re: , and

    Dave's right, dstracted.

    It's neither mandatory nor a general rule.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: , and

    Quote Originally Posted by dstracted View Post
    I would like to ask if is it mandatory or a general rule to always put a comma before the word 'and?'

    Example:
    I was becoming very tired, and it was hard to keep my emotions in check.

    Thanks!
    ********** NOT a teacher **********

    Hello, Dstracted.

    (1) I am an old man, so I follow the rules that I learned when I was

    younger:

    (a) If you have two independent sentences, you should use a comma

    in front of and:

    Do your homework every day.
    You certainly will pass the course.

    =

    Do you homework every day, and you certainly will pass the course.

    (b) If the two sentences are short, it is not necessary:

    We knocked.
    Nilda opened the door.

    =

    We knocked and Nilda opened the door.

    (2) I respectfully suggest that you use a comma, for your two

    independent sentences are long:

    I was becoming very tired.

    It was hard to keep my emotions in check.

    =

    I was becoming tired, and it was hard to keep my emotions in check.

    (a) In fact, I would respectfully suggest using so:

    I was becoming tired, so it was hard to keep my emotions in check.

    THANK YOU

    *****

    PLEASE remember that you may use a comma only between two

    independent sentences. Do not use it when the subject (I) did two things

    (took the test./passed it.):

    I took the test and passed it. (You probably know that this is called a

    compound verb.)

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